COVID 19 affects on College Basketball

RamblinRed

Walk On
Joined
Apr 3, 2019
Messages
7
Like
15
The effects on college basketball are likely to go on for years. But here are a couple.

First AD's are already seeing less revenue.
NCAA is paying out $225M to conferences this year due to the Tournament not being played. Expectation was for over $600M. NCAA has said they will give each of the 32 conferences $1.675M. They have not revealed how the other $171M will be distributed. Since most of that difference goes to P6 conferences, it will be those schools that are most affected by the lower payout.
Has not been officially said yet but expect the ACC to not distribute any money from the ACC Tourney to schools since it was cancelled.

Second, coaching changes. So far no P6 programs have fired a coach and a number that were expected to fire the coach not only did not fire them but gave them extensions. I don't expect there to be any coaching changes at the P6 level this year. That of course could mean alot more being fired in future years.

Third, scheduling for next season.
assuming there is a season (and that is not a definite), expect fewer buy games. There are already reports from low and mid majors that they are having issues getting buy games with P6 schools. With lower revenue AD's are telling their coaches they have to schedule fewer buy games and look for more home and home games with P6 opponents where the school doesn't have to be payed to come play. So expect fewer home games overall, but more against P6 opponents. For instance, ND had 7 buy games last year, Brey was told by his AD that he could not schedule more than 4 buy games next season. This is obviously a huge problem for low and mid majors as they rely on those buy games to fund their entire athletic departments.
 

orange79

Internet Sleuth
Joined
Aug 20, 2011
Messages
32,022
Like
90,855
Along these lines, I wonder, if there is no CBB this season, whether everyone gets another year of eligibility. Good arguments on both sides.
 

Dollar Dog

1987 forever
Joined
Dec 16, 2019
Messages
90
Like
340
Good thoughts. Hopefully, there IS a season this year.

I think there has to be a college basketball season -- along with all the other ones, pro or college. I don't care about fans wanting entertainment or P5 revenue losses. My concern is the hundreds of thousands of lower-to-middle income workers nationwide (food service, operations, vending, travel, hospitality, etc.) who depend on the sports industry for their livelihoods or a substantial portion of it. Many years ago, I was one of them.

If we wait until virus cases are close to zero or a vaccine is developed, there will be exponentially more people going broke than people dying from the virus. In my opinion, at some point government and private industry will need to open things up before this is completely beaten. As individuals, we can beat this by exercising painstaking responsibility to minimize hazard to ourselves and others. That also means we have no choice but to rely that others in our community understand the common good and will be doing the same.
 

sutomcat

Former Iggy Winner. I used to be somebody special
Staff member
Joined
Aug 15, 2011
Messages
17,001
Like
66,001
Along these lines, I wonder, if there is no CBB this season, whether everyone gets another year of eligibility. Good arguments on both sides.
From what I have read, there is close to zero chance players for winter sports are going to get another year of eligibility. It sounds like it is unlikely even that players from spring sports are going to get another year. It is a complex problem to solve, there are a number of thorny issues, the biggest of which is money. With the cancellation of the NCAA basketball tournament and the possibility of no football looming on the horizon, money is in short supply.

If it happens, I think it will be a deal where the NCAA lets schools bring players back if they want to and cam pay for them. That would, IMHO, be an awful solution that would give the haves another huge advantage on the have nots.
 

orange79

Internet Sleuth
Joined
Aug 20, 2011
Messages
32,022
Like
90,855
From what I have read, there is close to zero chance players for winter sports are going to get another year of eligibility. It sounds like it is unlikely even that players from spring sports are going to get another year. It is a complex problem to solve, there are a number of thorny issues, the biggest of which is money. With the cancellation of the NCAA basketball tournament and the possibility of no football looming on the horizon, money is in short supply.

If it happens, I think it will be a deal where the NCAA lets schools bring players back if they want to and cam pay for them. That would, IMHO, be an awful solution that would give the haves another huge advantage on the have nots.
Agree, but I was talking about the upcoming 2020-21 season. Unless I'm missing your point.
 

sutomcat

Former Iggy Winner. I used to be somebody special
Staff member
Joined
Aug 15, 2011
Messages
17,001
Like
66,001
Agree, but I was talking about the upcoming 2020-21 season. Unless I'm missing your point.
Alright, my bad. No idea what would happen if a whole season was canceled. That would be something

I believe the players who lost seasons because of of WWII were able to pick up where they left off after the war. That is probably the closest we have come to this. I will assume the same thing will happen here. If it comes to that.
 

Sherman20

2018 Iggy Leading Scorer Winner
Joined
Apr 25, 2017
Messages
2,745
Like
5,501
The economy will open back up and social distancing will eventually ease. But are we gonna have events with 20,000 people or 80,000 crammed together inside a stadium or arena? I worry that public health experts may tell us that’s unwise and could potentially lead to super-spreader events, even after the inital wave recedes. We’ll see. The government and our public health system needs to develop widespread testing capabilities, contact tracing, and mask availability for everyone. And we need to develop potential treatment options that could lessen the effects of the disease for people who have severe symptoms. Maybe they do temperature checks in public buildings like in South Korea or Singapore. But can we have large scale events with this virus circulating? I hope so. But I fear the public health experts may caution against it until better treatment or a vaccine is ready.
 

FireballPhil

Scout Team
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
252
Like
497
The NCAA is allowing spring athletes another year across the board, even allowing more room on teams to allow for those recruited to have spot. That is great.

The money problems are real, and so much depends on finding a vaccine/cure. The timing of it all is to difficult to predict, although one would suspect that it would come sooner rather than later with all the attention if scientists and labs all over the world racing to be the first one with it. The bigger hold up, at least here in the USA, is our own bureaucracy. Getting the okay could actually take longer than finding the cure.

Football season is the first major season to come up on the collegiate level. We would have less than half a year to come up with something before the season is affected. Since most scientists and federal regulators probably could care less about football season, it is highly probable the season will be majorly affected or cancelled.

Basketball doesn't start again until mid October, which gives us a bit more breathing room. Can everything come together by then? Possibly, especially if the malaria drugs they have okayed for treatment are as effective as they claim it to be.

Time will tell, but I remain optimistic, as the entire world is working together on the problem. Collectively we can get things done at a much quicker rate than we ever could on our own.
 

dan7800

2019-20 Iggy Winner Minutes Per Game
Joined
Sep 24, 2014
Messages
2,047
Like
3,070
Universities, like everyone else, is getting crushed by this. There are immense amounts of lost revenue that will impact sports for innumerable institutions.
 

cto

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Aug 26, 2011
Messages
5,119
Like
23,378
The economy will open back up and social distancing will eventually ease. But are we gonna have events with 20,000 people or 80,000 crammed together inside a stadium or arena? I worry that public health experts may tell us that’s unwise and could potentially lead to super-spreader events, even after the inital wave recedes. We’ll see. The government and our public health system needs to develop widespread testing capabilities, contact tracing, and mask availability for everyone. And we need to develop potential treatment options that could lessen the effects of the disease for people who have severe symptoms. Maybe they do temperature checks in public buildings like in South Korea or Singapore. But can we have large scale events with this virus circulating? I hope so. But I fear the public health experts may caution against it until better treatment or a vaccine is ready.
This is my concern. We will probably get the current outbreak under control. However, until there is a 100-percent-effective vaccine (such as we got for polio), it will keep cropping up. I'm an older person with some underlying health issues. I doubt I would want to go to a crowded theatre or arena while there remains a chance of catching the virus (and potentially dying from it).
 
Last edited:

kcsu

Living Legend
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
11,369
Like
17,622
Without treatment possibly without a cure sports as we know them will end.
Any older or at Risk individual wont risk their lives to attend a game.
What about older coaches, officials, administrators. Jim is mid 70's, Coach K, Roy...
Will these coaches risk their lives.
Its simple. No treatment, no sports.
 

FrancoPizza

2018 Iggy Leading Minutes Per Game Winner
Joined
Jan 27, 2015
Messages
5,799
Like
7,509
The economy will open back up and social distancing will eventually ease. But are we gonna have events with 20,000 people or 80,000 crammed together inside a stadium or arena? I worry that public health experts may tell us that’s unwise and could potentially lead to super-spreader events, even after the inital wave recedes. We’ll see. The government and our public health system needs to develop widespread testing capabilities, contact tracing, and mask availability for everyone. And we need to develop potential treatment options that could lessen the effects of the disease for people who have severe symptoms. Maybe they do temperature checks in public buildings like in South Korea or Singapore. But can we have large scale events with this virus circulating? I hope so. But I fear the public health experts may caution against it until better treatment or a vaccine is ready.
Litmus test will be the state fair. If that’s cancelled in late August I don’t see how college football stands a chance just a couple weeks later. And if I can’t get pizze fritte this year then shlitts gonna get real ugly.
 

RamblinRed

Walk On
Joined
Apr 3, 2019
Messages
7
Like
15
Survey results from 110 AD's about the future due to COVID 19. It isn't pretty

86% expect to have to make 'financial sacrifices' and over 1/3 of AD's forecast at least a 30% drop in revenue

About two-thirds of respondents said the most likely outcome of the crisis for their departments is a decrease in enrollment at their schools. Slightly more than half believe there will be decreased fan interest.

More than two-thirds of ADs (67 percent) agree or strongly agree they must find a way to limit coaches' salaries.

More than half of the ADs (56 percent) say they agree a way must be found to limit buyouts.

Less than half of the Power Five athletic departments (41 percent) have sufficient financial reserves to ride out the crisis. Only 26% of Group of Five departments have enough reserves.

Over the next three months, 89 percent of ADs are most concerned about academic progress of their athletes, who are studying remotely with the shuttering of schools due to the virus.

After financial concerns, the greatest fear of ADs (39 percent) in six months is "morale and culture."

Summing up the current climate, one AD wrote, "Due to the crisis and nature of what is going on nationally, I think that this is horrible time to be implementing name, image and likeness and one-time immediate transfers. The financial landscape is going to look so much different going forward."
 

RamblinRed

Walk On
Joined
Apr 3, 2019
Messages
7
Like
15

Iowa St is the first, though likely not the last, who is taking a one-time cut to pay and bonuses for coaches as 2 of 6 measures they are instituting to deal with a projected $5M shortfall. The shortfall is from the loss of revenues from the B12 Tournament and NCAA Tournament.
 

3UNCdooksux

Walk On
Joined
Jul 9, 2013
Messages
27
Like
70
I think there has to be a college basketball season -- along with all the other ones, pro or college. I don't care about fans wanting entertainment or P5 revenue losses. My concern is the hundreds of thousands of lower-to-middle income workers nationwide (food service, operations, vending, travel, hospitality, etc.) who depend on the sports industry for their livelihoods or a substantial portion of it. Many years ago, I was one of them.

If we wait until virus cases are close to zero or a vaccine is developed, there will be exponentially more people going broke than people dying from the virus. In my opinion, at some point government and private industry will need to open things up before this is completely beaten. As individuals, we can beat this by exercising painstaking responsibility to minimize hazard to ourselves and others. That also means we have no choice but to rely that others in our community understand the common good and will be doing the same.


I completely agree. And the pundits need to start talking positively about maybe college football will kick off the return to sports. After the obvious effects of COVID-19 the biggest concern is people's mental health. If people like Kirk Herbstreit start talking now how "no way college football coming back" then people now are going to start falling into the category of, "then why are we self-isolating?" At some point the general public needs to be reassured that our efforts today are not in vain. If the discussion keeps giving the indication of doom and gloom people will eventually go What and give up or worse. At some point once the curve is flattened and pandemic goes down we HAVE to return to normal and go forward. Otherwise what kind of life will we have? EVERYONE STAY SAFE! Looking forward to the day where battling our ACC foes on the field and trash talking becomes important again!
 

longtimefan

All American
Joined
Aug 25, 2011
Messages
6,373
Like
7,230
Last night, Trevor Noah had an extended discussion with Bill Gates, who probably knows as much or more about the current situation as anyone--because his foundation has concentrated on infectious diseases (he has given a TED talk on the subject, and wrote an extended piece for the New England Journal of Medicine); and, of course, he knows a bit about commerce. He was not alarmist, but he certainly was not sanguine. He says it will take several months to get business and education going, and that athletics, because of arena/stadium crowds, will lag well behind.

On a happier note--he is contributing $100 million to the development of a vaccine. There are more than 20 teams working on developing a vaccine right now. He and his people will review their work, pick what they determine to be the 7 best candidates, and fund their activities--labs, materials, staff, etc. Out of this, they expect there will be 1 or 2 vaccines that are efficacious and safe. Just the same, he still sees a 12 to 18 month timeline for getting a vaccine into full distribution.
 

bballbeadle

Woman of a certain age
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
14,106
Like
30,892
The economy will open back up and social distancing will eventually ease. But are we gonna have events with 20,000 people or 80,000 crammed together inside a stadium or arena? I worry that public health experts may tell us that’s unwise and could potentially lead to super-spreader events, even after the inital wave recedes. We’ll see. The government and our public health system needs to develop widespread testing capabilities, contact tracing, and mask availability for everyone. And we need to develop potential treatment options that could lessen the effects of the disease for people who have severe symptoms. Maybe they do temperature checks in public buildings like in South Korea or Singapore. But can we have large scale events with this virus circulating? I hope so. But I fear the public health experts may caution against it until better treatment or a vaccine is ready.
How to administer vaccines and antibody tests to 350,000,000 people in a timely fashion? You can’t. That is why I believe colleges will not open up next year and there will be no sports for the season of 2020-21. The thought of that makes me nauseous but if for some unfathomable reason colleges opened up this fall, who is going to attend games? I have season tickets to football and basketball. I won’t go.

:( :( :(
 

bballbeadle

Woman of a certain age
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
14,106
Like
30,892
This is my concern. We will probably get the current outbreak under control. However, until there is a 100-percent-effective vaccine (such as we got for polio), it will keep cropping up. I'm an older person with some underlying health issues. I doubt I would want to go to a crowded theatre or arena while there remains a chance of catching the virus (and potentially dying from it).
Oh my gosh, how much I have loved being in the middle of a frenzied crowd!
 

supp

Hall of Fame
Joined
Aug 28, 2011
Messages
8,193
Like
14,044
Survey results from 110 AD's about the future due to COVID 19. It isn't pretty

86% expect to have to make 'financial sacrifices' and over 1/3 of AD's forecast at least a 30% drop in revenue

About two-thirds of respondents said the most likely outcome of the crisis for their departments is a decrease in enrollment at their schools. Slightly more than half believe there will be decreased fan interest.

More than two-thirds of ADs (67 percent) agree or strongly agree they must find a way to limit coaches' salaries.

More than half of the ADs (56 percent) say they agree a way must be found to limit buyouts.

Less than half of the Power Five athletic departments (41 percent) have sufficient financial reserves to ride out the crisis. Only 26% of Group of Five departments have enough reserves.

Over the next three months, 89 percent of ADs are most concerned about academic progress of their athletes, who are studying remotely with the shuttering of schools due to the virus.

After financial concerns, the greatest fear of ADs (39 percent) in six months is "morale and culture."

Summing up the current climate, one AD wrote, "Due to the crisis and nature of what is going on nationally, I think that this is horrible time to be implementing name, image and likeness and one-time immediate transfers. The financial landscape is going to look so much different going forward."

Private universities could take a huge hit in the Fall. All of these unemployed parents will not be in a position to pay $60K to send their kids to school.
 

upperdeck

Living Legend
Joined
Aug 26, 2011
Messages
19,598
Like
17,016
how many people actually pay for school? everyone i know the kids have crazy debt but the parents dont pay anything.. its why the pay model is broken..

if your parents makes 20K you go for free cause of school aid
if your parents make 100K you owe 100K in loans
if your parents make 5000K you go for free cause they just pay for school.

what does family income matter when most kids take out loans anyway? why do poor kids get no loan deals?
 

bballbeadle

Woman of a certain age
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
14,106
Like
30,892
Private universities could take a huge hit in the Fall. All of these unemployed parents will not be in a position to pay $60K to send their kids to school.
Universities will be completely reconfigured. Tuition debt can no longer be tolerated. I only pray they can do this while also having sports teams. And what about our beautiful new Dome???
 

supp

Hall of Fame
Joined
Aug 28, 2011
Messages
8,193
Like
14,044
how many people actually pay for school? everyone i know the kids have crazy debt but the parents dont pay anything.. its why the pay model is broken..

if your parents makes 20K you go for free cause of school aid
if your parents make 100K you owe 100K in loans
if your parents make 5000K you go for free cause they just pay for school.

what does family income matter when most kids take out loans anyway? why do poor kids get no loan deals?

I've never heard of student loans that cover all expenses. The only exception I can think of is med school. Private schools, especially second and lower tier schools, will likely take a hit in the Fall. We may have a new wave of schools going out of business. When you consider how many schools' budget plans increasingly depend on international students paying full fare, then you realize what a crisis this is. If there are limited international flights or no visas issued to the Chinese, for example, the economic model of a lot of schools goes up in smoke.
 

Online statistics

Members online
207
Guests online
970
Total visitors
1,177

Top Bottom