Great quick trip to end summer

Capt. Tuttle

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#1
On the way back from Cleveland. On Saturday, we saw James Garfield's mausoleum. (Very cool. Still laying in state.)
Then the Cleveland museum, which included Mattice, Van Gogh, Picasso, Worhol, and others, and some cool botanical gardens.
That evening, an Asian lantern festival (ends Labor day.) All great, and within 5 hours of Syracuse.
Highly recommend.
IMG_20180818_214821.jpg
 
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Shrmdougluvr

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#5
Does anyone want to take a stab at identifying "the American cities?"

I'd imagine now-a-days its something like (East-ish to West-ish with rationale in brackets):
  • NYC [self-explanatory]
  • Boston/Philly [historic, strong regional cultures, NYC-Jr.]
  • D.C. [no locals]
  • Miami/Tampa [Southern International]
  • Charlotte/Atlanta/Jacksonville [Southern carpetbaggers- seem to lack a real distinct culture]
  • Nashville/(Charleston)/(Richmond) [Southern]
  • Detroit/Pittsburgh/Cleveland/Cincinnati [Best days are behind them - NE-MW culture]
  • Baltimore/Louisville/Memphis/St. Louis [Best days are behind them - Southern culture]
  • Chicago [Midwest giant]
  • Indianapolis/Milwaukee/Twin Cities/Omaha/Kansas City/Salt Lake City [Midwest nice]
  • New Orleans [Laissez les bon temps ruler]
  • Houston/Dallas-Ft. Worth/Oklahoma City/Tulsa [Southwest Big Oil]
  • Austin/Denver [Midwest quirky]
  • San Antonio/El Paso/Albuquerque/Phoenix [Southwest]
  • Las Vegas [IDK, doesnt seem to fit with anywhere else]
  • San Diego [Pacific]
  • L.A. [Pacific International Show Biz]
  • San Francisco [Pacific International Culture]
  • San Jose (Silicon Valley)
  • Portland/Seattle (Cascadia)
  • Honolulu [Tropical Pacific International]
 
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chugg21

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#6
Does anyone want to take a stab at identifying "the American cities?"

I'd imagine now-a-days its something like (East-ish to West-ish with rationale in brackets):
  • NYC [self-explanatory]
  • Boston/Philly [historic, strong regional cultures, NYC-Jr.]
  • D.C. [no locals]
  • Miami/Tampa [Southern International]
  • Charlotte/Atlanta/Jacksonville [Southern carpetbaggers- seem to lack a real distinct culture]
  • Nashville/(Charleston)/(Richmond) [Southern]
  • Detroit/Pittsburgh/Cleveland/Cincinnati [Best days are behind them - NE-MW culture]
  • Baltimore/Louisville/Memphis/St. Louis [Best days are behind them - Southern culture]
  • Chicago [Midwest giant]
  • Indianapolis/Milwaukee/Twin Cities/Omaha/Kansas City/Salt Lake City [Midwest nice]
  • New Orleans [Laissez les bon temps ruler]
  • Houston/Dallas-Ft. Worth/Oklahoma City/Tulsa [Southwest Big Oil]
  • Austin/Denver [Midwest quirky]
  • San Antonio/El Paso/Albuquerque/Phoenix [Southwest]
  • Las Vegas [IDK, doesnt seem to fit with anywhere else]
  • San Diego [Pacific]
  • L.A. [Pacific International Show Biz]
  • San Francisco [Pacific International Culture]
  • San Jose (Silicon Valley)
  • Portland/Seattle (Cascadia)
  • Honolulu [Tropical Pacific International]
If I had family visiting from outside of the country and they wanted to see American culture, I think I would send them to NYC, New Orleans, San Francisco. I guess LA might be necessary but I think NYC basically covers it for the most part. Vegas is quite a sight but also kind of an embarassment. Not sure what other cities have their own distinct culture that really seems worthwhile if someone had limited time and places they could visit. Maybe Miami would make the cut but probably not worthwhile either.
 

OttoMets

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#7
Does anyone want to take a stab at identifying "the American cities?"

I'd imagine now-a-days its something like (East-ish to West-ish with rationale in brackets):
  • NYC [self-explanatory]
  • Boston/Philly [historic, strong regional cultures, NYC-Jr.]
  • D.C. [no locals]
  • Miami/Tampa [Southern International]
  • Charlotte/Atlanta/Jacksonville [Southern carpetbaggers- seem to lack a real distinct culture]
  • Nashville/(Charleston)/(Richmond) [Southern]
  • Detroit/Pittsburgh/Cleveland/Cincinnati [Best days are behind them - NE-MW culture]
  • Baltimore/Louisville/Memphis/St. Louis [Best days are behind them - Southern culture]
  • Chicago [Midwest giant]
  • Indianapolis/Milwaukee/Twin Cities/Omaha/Kansas City/Salt Lake City [Midwest nice]
  • New Orleans [Laissez les bon temps ruler]
  • Houston/Dallas-Ft. Worth/Oklahoma City/Tulsa [Southwest Big Oil]
  • Austin/Denver [Midwest quirky]
  • San Antonio/El Paso/Albuquerque/Phoenix [Southwest]
  • Las Vegas [IDK, doesnt seem to fit with anywhere else]
  • San Diego [Pacific]
  • L.A. [Pacific International Show Biz]
  • San Francisco [Pacific International Culture]
  • San Jose (Silicon Valley)
  • Portland/Seattle (Cascadia)
  • Honolulu [Tropical Pacific International]
I think the cut-off is somewhere around the size and density of Filthadelphia (which doesn't appear to be on your list?). It's a city.

That's the place with the characteristics that strikes me as a big American city, and whenever I visit a smaller place, no matter how hyped, it always is somehow underwhelming. Denver and Minneapolis - very cool in their own right, but they don't really match the expectations I have for cities. Houston's got a lot to offer, but it's towers amidst giant sprawl.

San Francisco and even Los Angeles, they're real cities. Boston's borderline, so provincial, but it's a city. New York and Chicago, obviously. D.C. is exactly what F. Scott Fitzgerald said a century ago ("...harsh repellent light...distance without freedom...pomp without splendor...a pasty-pale and self-conscious city" - right on the nose), but it's come a long way and I think has made the leap to "city" status. I don't disagree with the "no locals" assessment, though.

That's about it, as far as I'm concerned. Though a lot of those other mid-sized places are awesome. I love Cleveland, fun town.
 

CuseFaninVT

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#8
I think the cut-off is somewhere around the size and density of Filthadelphia (which doesn't appear to be on your list?). It's a city.

That's the place with the characteristics that strikes me as a big American city, and whenever I visit a smaller place, no matter how hyped, it always is somehow underwhelming. Denver and Minneapolis - very cool in their own right, but they don't really match the expectations I have for cities. Houston's got a lot to offer, but it's towers amidst giant sprawl.

San Francisco and even Los Angeles, they're real cities. Boston's borderline, so provincial, but it's a city. New York and Chicago, obviously. D.C. is exactly what F. Scott Fitzgerald said a century ago ("...harsh repellent light...distance without freedom...pomp without splendor...a pasty-pale and self-conscious city" - right on the nose), but it's come a long way and I think has made the leap to "city" status. I don't disagree with the "no locals" assessment, though.

That's about it, as far as I'm concerned. Though a lot of those other mid-sized places are awesome. I love Cleveland, fun town.
Philly was lumped in with Boston, likely due to size, in the second bullet of his list.
 

CuseFaninVT

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#9
I said it in another thread, but I highly recommend Ottawa. Just enough city to be interesting, while still maintaining that Canadian friendly feel. Incredible museums, tons of history, plenty of great food.
 

Cusefan0307

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#12
I think the cut-off is somewhere around the size and density of Filthadelphia (which doesn't appear to be on your list?). It's a city.

That's the place with the characteristics that strikes me as a big American city, and whenever I visit a smaller place, no matter how hyped, it always is somehow underwhelming. Denver and Minneapolis - very cool in their own right, but they don't really match the expectations I have for cities. Houston's got a lot to offer, but it's towers amidst giant sprawl.

San Francisco and even Los Angeles, they're real cities. Boston's borderline, so provincial, but it's a city. New York and Chicago, obviously. D.C. is exactly what F. Scott Fitzgerald said a century ago ("...harsh repellent light...distance without freedom...pomp without splendor...a pasty-pale and self-conscious city" - right on the nose), but it's come a long way and I think has made the leap to "city" status. I don't disagree with the "no locals" assessment, though.

That's about it, as far as I'm concerned. Though a lot of those other mid-sized places are awesome. I love Cleveland, fun town.
I love Denver and Minneapolis. Both cities are clean and really modern. Every city I have been to has something different to offer especially with difference in climates. We were just in Minneapolis at the end of July and it was a great time. Surly brewing company stacks up with any Craft Brewery in the Northeast.

I love NYC and have been going there since I was a kid, but it's almost too crowded. Same with LA.
 

CuseFaninVT

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#13
I love Denver and Minneapolis. Both cities are clean and really modern. Every city I have been to has something different to offer especially with difference in climates. We were just in Minneapolis at the end of July and it was a great time. Surly brewing company stacks up with any Craft Brewery in the Northeast.

I love NYC and have been going there since I was a kid, but it's almost too crowded. Same with LA.
I'm sure surly is just fine, but slow your roll my friend. Come to VT and I'll show you real craft brewing...

EDIT - and by the way, I love Minny.
 

OttoMets

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#14
I love Denver and Minneapolis. Both cities are clean and really modern. Every city I have been to has something different to offer especially with difference in climates. We were just in Minneapolis at the end of July and it was a great time. Surly brewing company stacks up with any Craft Brewery in the Northeast.

I love NYC and have been going there since I was a kid, but it's almost too crowded. Same with LA.
New York is too touristy now. I love Manhattan, one of my very favorite places, but the guided tour groups moving (slowly) around Central Park even in the early morning this weekend were just ridiculous.

I like all those mid-sized cities, don't get me wrong, but in some ways they're the victims of their popularity - Portlands and Minneapolises and such are hyped so much that they can't match expectations. They're just cities that aren't as great as New York and San Francisco. Not that there's anything wrong with that...
 
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#15
On the way back from Cleveland. On Saturday, we saw James Garfield's mausoleum. (Very cool. Still laying in state.)
Then the Cleveland museum, which included Mattice, Van Gogh, Picasso, Worhol, and others, and some cool botanical gardens.
That evening, an Asian lantern festival (ends Labor day.) All great, and within 5 hours of Syracuse.
Highly recommend. View attachment 137649
Now I feel uncultured. We recently drove right through Cleveland to make it to Cedar Point for 12 hours of roller coaster riding. Top Speed Dragster
 

CuseFaninVT

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#16
New York is too touristy now. I love Manhattan, one of my very favorite places, but the guided tour groups moving (slowly) around Central Park even in the early morning this weekend were just ridiculous.

I like all those mid-sized cities, don't get me wrong, but in some ways they're the victims of their popularity - Portlands and Minneapolises and such are hyped so much that they can't match expectations. They're just cities that aren't as great as New York and San Francisco. Not that there's anything wrong with that...
I will always love Portland. That and Boise are my favorite places in the US. Easily. Burlington ain't bad either.
 

OttoMets

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#17
I will always love Portland. That and Boise are my favorite places in the US. Easily. Burlington ain't bad either.
Now Burlington was another for me. Fun, but probably I'd heard too many great things that it couldn't match. Also, the two times I've visited have been in winter.

Portland, Maine, on the other hand, blew my expectations out of the water the only time I was there. Phenomenal place.
 

CuseFaninVT

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#18
Now Burlington was another for me. Fun, but probably I'd heard too many great things that it couldn't match. Also, the two times I've visited have been in winter.

Portland, Maine, on the other hand, blew my expectations out of the water the only time I was there. Phenomenal place.
Some great food and beer to be found in the east coast Portland as well.

Part of the allure for me with Portland is I was there multiple times, and my cousin lived there, so I had a local guide who took me to the coolest of the cool joints.

All I'd have to do to get my wife to move there permanently was to go during August / September before the rains start back up, and take her to Powells.
 

Shrmdougluvr

Lover of Sherman Douglas
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#19
New York is too touristy now. I love Manhattan, one of my very favorite places, but the guided tour groups moving (slowly) around Central Park even in the early morning this weekend were just ridiculous.
Interesting you say that. I live in the Capital District and dont get to big cities often. I'd say the pace in Albany is about on par with Boston and Providence, and it is a little faster than Syracuse, faster than Baltimore, and much faster than New Orleans (languid). I was in Manhattan this weekend. I don't get down to The City very often and i probably havent been for about 5 years, but know i always have to move my ass to keep up down there. Holy hell was i surprised by all the people dawdling on Madison, Park, 33rd, etc. And it wasnt just the folks with their heads cocked-back. It stood out to me.
 

OttoMets

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#20
Interesting you say that. I live in the Capital District and dont get to big cities often. I'd say the pace in Albany is about on par with Boston and Providence, and it is a little faster than Syracuse, faster than Baltimore, and much faster than New Orleans (languid). I was in Manhattan this weekend. I don't get down to The City very often and i probably havent been for about 5 years, but know i always have to move my ass to keep up down there. Holy hell was i surprised by all the people dawdling on Madison, Park, 33rd, etc. And it wasnt just the folks with their heads cocked-back. It stood out to me.
The smartphone fad has a little to do with this, too, I think. On a related note, I really am starting to think that ride-hailing is fundamentally changing the way many people interact with cities, and not in a positive way. Too many fat-asses standing four abreast on the sidewalk waiting for their Ubers, and too many Uber drivers causing all kinds of havoc on the avenues.
 

OrangeDW

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#21
The smartphone fad has a little to do with this, too, I think. On a related note, I really am starting to think that ride-hailing is fundamentally changing the way many people interact with cities, and not in a positive way. Too many fat-asses standing four abreast on the sidewalk waiting for their Ubers, and too many Uber drivers causing all kinds of havoc on the avenues.
Ugh. In NY? I’ve only been to NY maybe once or twice this decade but used to go in the 90s and 00’s often. One of my favorite things about New York was always being able to walk just about everywhere. I couldn’t even imagine taking an Uber there, unless I had just arrived and didn’t want to lug my bags all the way to my hotel or something. Otherwise I’m walking pretty much the whole time I’m there.
 

chugg21

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#22
Ugh. In NY? I’ve only been to NY maybe once or twice this decade but used to go in the 90s and 00’s often. One of my favorite things about New York was always being able to walk just about everywhere. I couldn’t even imagine taking an Uber there, unless I had just arrived and didn’t want to lug my bags all the way to my hotel or something. Otherwise I’m walking pretty much the whole time I’m there.
I'm pretty set on never visiting NYC or LA ever again. The congestion and frustration of people everywhere at all times just doesn't offset the positives for me anymore.
 


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