OT: Live stream of bears feeding on salmon in Alaska

cto

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#3

CuseFaninVT

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#8
Thanks for sharing that. My 9 year old son just watched with me. He thought some of the fish jumping were hysterical, especially the one jumping the wrong way. Then we got to watch a bear catch and eat a fish. Awesome.
 

AlaskaSU

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#9
kinda fascinating

The cameras are powdered by solar and wind energy, and the feed is uploaded through the T1 connection in King Salmon.

http://explore.org/#!/live-cams/player/brown-bear-salmon-cam-brooks-falls

those bears, like all fishermen, are patient souls
For you lower 48's
The two famous bear fishing areas are Brooks, and Pack Creek which is my neck of the woods. Locals go to a place called Sweetheart Flats where subsistence fishing is allowed, 25 salmon per day per Alaska resident. Just like the old days, people dip net into foaming water from shoreside cliffs. Brown Bears (Grizzlies) also fish the area. We ignore the sows even if they have cubs. They do not mind people as humans provide protection for them from Boars. that is why Pack Creek is full of sows. Bears are smart. Males prefer to avoid people. When the big males show up its time to leave. My Ruger 44 is full of bite marks, right into the metal through the holster, from the biggest bear I've ever seen at the Flats, but that is another story.
 

moqui

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#10
subsistence fishing is allowed, 25 salmon per day per Alaska resident.
25 salmon per resident per day is subsistence?

Just like the old days, people dip net into foaming water from shoreside cliffs.
doesn't seem very sporting . . . I never did it, but I remember when I was a kid my dad used to use treble hooks to snag spawning salmon in the Salmon River; that's been illegal for years.
 

ebucklewis

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#11
25 salmon per resident per day is subsistence?


doesn't seem very sporting . . . I never did it, but I remember when I was a kid my dad used to use treble hooks to snag spawning salmon in the Salmon River; that's been illegal for years.
well, this is a fishing thread - love this ad
 

CuseFaninVT

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#12
25 salmon per resident per day is subsistence?


doesn't seem very sporting . . . I never did it, but I remember when I was a kid my dad used to use treble hooks to snag spawning salmon in the Salmon River; that's been illegal for years.
Very short amount of time to collect what they will need for the winter or to sell to the rest of us.
 

SU2NASA

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#14
25 salmon per resident per day is subsistence?


doesn't seem very sporting . . . I never did it, but I remember when I was a kid my dad used to use treble hooks to snag spawning salmon in the Salmon River; that's been illegal for years.
A real man uses a harpoon.
 

jvbj01

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#15
My son lives in Anchorage. I will make another trip next year at this time. I am fascinated by the state.
 

AlaskaSU

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#16
Salmon are not endangered in AK. Every stream is swarming with fish. Most rivers are undisturbed. Subsistence fish get passed around to family members etc. Outside of Anchorage, stores are expensive. Everyone puts up fish. they do shrink when smoked.

There are also Native hunting allotments. I have a friend who is a professional Proxy Hunter. He fulfills the allotments for Natives that are too old to hunt etc. I guess he gets paid by the State. He brought up his kids in a very remote section of Prince of Wales Island. You can't get more remote. it is like living with wolves. I know his daughter. Just like a story book fairy tale: she is a graceful blond that waltzes with the fluidity of someone graduating from a French dancing school, yet she captains her own fishing boat. her name is Mariah.

If someone just showed up at Sweetheart Flats with all the equipment but not knowing what to do they could try all day and they would be guaranteed to not get a single fish. You have to know what you are doing.

Here are some details to entertain you all during off-season. The Flats consist of a series of 3 small lakes each perched above the other and connected by waterfalls that salmon amazingly jump. My technique is to go in with a team of three. Climb through the muddy hills alongside the system to get to the top lake. Rope off the person handling the net to a tree so he or she can safely stay at the edge of a cliff far above white water. Another person is below the dip netter on a flat ledge. The dip net handle is very long, like 25'. The dipper moves the net through the white water and sweeps it up to the cliff downstream where the second person unloads the net. Hence, the net makes a big sweeping arc. A third person helps kill the fish and string them up.

When the fishing is done, everyone climbs into the pond to handle the fish which are strung with rope. By clinging to the rocks you slowly work your way downstream all the way to the first pond. The fish would be too heavy to drag over land.

At the bottom you clean the fish and if all goes well, no boar shows up. You get out at high tide as that is the only time that a skiff can be floated up the creek to the lower pond. A group of 3 people = 75 sockeye salmon. A lot of work but I am very quick as I fished commercially soon after college. Luckily I was grandfathered in for a limited entry commercial fishing permit. However, subsistence fishing is open to any Alaskan.

Even though everyone is armed when a big boar shows up in a constrained area it is time to tuck tail. The flats are about 50 miles south of where I live. A worse case trip would be where a boar is patrolling the place where you land a skiff. No fishing that day. There are usually sows around but they are no big deal. If you are not an Alaskan you will never see this place or experience it.
 

CuseTroop

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#17
My son lives in Anchorage. I will make another trip next year at this time. I am fascinated by the state.
You make it up to Fairbanks I'll show ya a good time. Denali is a good place to meet up too, I met some family there a couple weeks ago. I have a buddy who is a tour bus driver into the park, free rides!
 

CuseTroop

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#18
Salmon are not endangered in AK. Every stream is swarming with fish. Most rivers are undisturbed. Subsistence fish get passed around to family members etc. Outside of Anchorage, stores are expensive. Everyone puts up fish. they do shrink when smoked.

There are also Native hunting allotments. I have a friend who is a professional Proxy Hunter. He fulfills the allotments for Natives that are too old to hunt etc. I guess he gets paid by the State. He brought up his kids in a very remote section of Prince of Wales Island. You can't get more remote. it is like living with wolves. I know his daughter. Just like a story book fairy tale: she is a graceful blond that waltzes with the fluidity of someone graduating from a French dancing school, yet she captains her own fishing boat. her name is Mariah.

If someone just showed up at Sweetheart Flats with all the equipment but not knowing what to do they could try all day and they would be guaranteed to not get a single fish. You have to know what you are doing.

Here are some details to entertain you all during off-season. The Flats consist of a series of 3 small lakes each perched above the other and connected by waterfalls that salmon amazingly jump. My technique is to go in with a team of three. Climb through the muddy hills alongside the system to get to the top lake. Rope off the person handling the net to a tree so he or she can safely stay at the edge of a cliff far above white water. Another person is below the dip netter on a flat ledge. The dip net handle is very long, like 25'. The dipper moves the net through the white water and sweeps it up to the cliff downstream where the second person unloads the net. Hence, the net makes a big sweeping arc. A third person helps kill the fish and string them up.

When the fishing is done, everyone climbs into the pond to handle the fish which are strung with rope. By clinging to the rocks you slowly work your way downstream all the way to the first pond. The fish would be too heavy to drag over land.

At the bottom you clean the fish and if all goes well, no boar shows up. You get out at high tide as that is the only time that a skiff can be floated up the creek to the lower pond. A group of 3 people = 75 sockeye salmon. A lot of work but I am very quick as I fished commercially soon after college. Luckily I was grandfathered in for a limited entry commercial fishing permit. However, subsistence fishing is open to any Alaskan.

Even though everyone is armed when a big boar shows up in a constrained area it is time to tuck tail. The flats are about 50 miles south of where I live. A worse case trip would be where a boar is patrolling the place where you land a skiff. No fishing that day. There are usually sows around but they are no big deal. If you are not an Alaskan you will never see this place or experience it.
Man, I gotta get down to your neck of the woods. I'll be down in a native village, Anvic (sp) for 2 weeks moose hunting in September tho, closest I'll be to you till prolly November
 

AlaskaSU

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#19
CuseTroop,
I might go down to the Flats next week. If you were here I'd take you. its a 50 mile boat ride from town. Weather is always unpredictable in Stephens Passage.
 

SU2NASA

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#20
That's friggin' awesome. I loved the bear just standing on the top of the falls, just snagging fish jumping up the falls.
 

Eric15

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#21
Alaska is an amazing place. I've been there twice for work - once to Juneau and once to Anchorage. In Juneau, everywhere you look is like a Bob Ross painting.
 

CuseTroop

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#22
CuseTroop,
I might go down to the Flats next week. If you were here I'd take you. its a 50 mile boat ride from town. Weather is always unpredictable in Stephens Passage.
Ahh I wish, lol. Dont worry tho, I dont plan on leaving Alaska until the wife drags me out kicking and screaming. I'll get down your way.
 

CuseFaninVT

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#25
i have to admit i haven't stopped watching this at work since it was posted.
Been checking in pretty regularly as well. More bears today but the fish aren't nearly as active. I wonder if there is a correlation of if this salmon run is coming to an end.
 


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