UConn cancels Spring Game

TexanMark

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#3
Well...for northern teams it does have some merit. I wonder if this becomes a trend?
 

Hoo's That

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#7
Well...for northern teams it does have some merit. I wonder if this becomes a trend?
A lot of teams are changing from having a game to having a controlled practice. By having a practice the coaches can set up the situations they want instead of leaving them to chance. If you’re not an SEC team with 40+K in attendance it doesn’t matter what format you use.
 

sutomcat

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#8
I agree...this year felt like a transition. Probably better to do a fan fest in August and have an invite only Spring Practice with an edited tape for the ACC Network.
I think UConn has a much different situation than Syracuse. The coming ACC Network needs content. I expect ESPN will put pressure on all ACC schools to not only have spring games, but produce back stories, follow up stories, etc. Thst content will help fill all the open time available once baseball, softball and lacrosse end.
 

RandygoCuse

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#11
Well...for northern teams it does have some merit. I wonder if this becomes a trend?
The Northeast is certainly not football country. We've seen Northeastern, BU, and Hofstra all elminate their programs all together. UMass moving up was a mistake on massive proportions. A lot of these schools need to think if they should be trying to compete in football or put their resources elsewhere.
 

Trueblue25

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#12
The Northeast is certainly not football country. We've seen Northeastern, BU, and Hofstra all elminate their programs all together. UMass moving up was a mistake on massive proportions. A lot of these schools need to think if they should be trying to compete in football or put their resources elsewhere.
Could look at UB.

Moved to d1, produced a potential hall of fame calibre linebacker. Potential. Now also has a solid MAC program thats building momentum into this season.

The NE isnt dead. Not yet I guess
 

Scooch

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#13
Could look at UB.

Moved to d1, produced a potential hall of fame calibre linebacker. Potential. Now also has a solid MAC program thats building momentum into this season.

The NE isnt dead. Not yet I guess
I don't know, I think UB is a case study in why a northeastern school investing in a new or upgraded FBS football program really isn't worth it.

Buffalo is, what, nearly 20 years into having a FBS program? I don't know how much money they've pumped into the program, but I suspect it's a non-trivial amount. And for that they've built a .500-ish MAC program that draws 15K a game.

There's just not enough interest and talent in the northeast to support a lot of FBS programs. One of the most under-discussed reasons for SU's revival in the late 80s and 90s was the lack of northeast competition. Pitt's program fell apart, BC didn't capitalize on Flutie then had a crippling scandal, Rutgers & Temple were jokes, and UConn, Buffalo & UMass didn't exist. We landed a lot of recruits who didn't have many other options.

And every bit of data I've ever seen suggests that the northeast has the weakest interest in college football of any region in the country, by far. Hell, the 2nd-most popular program among northeast fans is a school that is located in Indiana!

Seems like Penn State and maybe 1 or 2 other northeast FBS programs can thrive simultaneously. Rest of the schools in the region have a very tough battle for relevance and success. I sure wouldn't be investing in it if I were an administrator at a school that isn't already P5.
 

Chip

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#14
One of the most under-discussed reasons for SU's revival in the late 80s and 90s was the lack of northeast competition. Pitt's program fell apart, BC didn't capitalize on Flutie then had a crippling scandal, Rutgers & Temple were jokes, and UConn, Buffalo & UMass didn't exist. We landed a lot of recruits who didn't have many other options.
Not under-discussed to this fan! We capitalized on that, and it was glorious. But then those programs decided they wanted to do more than just cash their checks.

West Virginia has always managed to stay fairly relevant through it all, even with their own bad hire.
 

Scooch

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#15
Not under-discussed to this fan! We capitalized on that, and it was glorious. But then those programs decided they wanted to do more than just cash their checks.

West Virginia has always managed to stay fairly relevant through it all, even with their own bad hire.
West Virginia is a land unto itself. Like Narnia.
 

Ish88888

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#16
The Northeast is certainly not football country. We've seen Northeastern, BU, and Hofstra all elminate their programs all together. UMass moving up was a mistake on massive proportions. A lot of these schools need to think if they should be trying to compete in football or put their resources elsewhere.
Very true and that said, the northeast has a solid density of 1AA leagues. Not sure what exactly the economics are vs playing G5 football, but yes, far less investment and obviously far less $$$ coming in too.
 

Hoo's That

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#17
Very true and that said, the northeast has a solid density of 1AA leagues. Not sure what exactly the economics are vs playing G5 football, but yes, far less investment and obviously far less $$$ coming in too.
Primarily the scholarships. D-1AA teams can spread up to 65 scholarships over a maximum of 85 players, while D-1A teams can give out up to 85 scholarships, but all players on scholarship must be given a full scholarship, no partials allowed.
 

MaxwellCuse

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#18
Primarily the scholarships. D-1AA teams can spread up to 65 scholarships over a maximum of 85 players, while D-1A teams can give out up to 85 scholarships, but all players on scholarship must be given a full scholarship, no partials allowed.
There is also a world of difference between FCS coaching salaries and those paid out to a HC such as Dino Babers at SU, let alone the coaches at Bama, Clemson and Oklahoma. A semi-recent article:

Scanning FCS Coaches’ Salaries | A Sea of Red
 

MaxwellCuse

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#20
I became a casual fan of the Patriot League when my daughter was a student at Lafayette College. I still read an FCS-centric fan forum (AnyGivenSaturday) now and then. This data on Patriot League football budgets was posted a few months back:

Fordham $7,060,178
Lafayette $6,581,062
Holy Cross $6,162,749
Colgate $5,899,143
Bucknell $5,672,257
Lehigh $5,301,592
Georgetown $2,117,506

UCONN would probably want to fund to a level at least on par with Fordham. On the other hand, their fans seem to think they are on the "Public Ivy" level academically, so maybe they should aspire to a Georgetown-like football budget.
 

Lynch1967

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#22
I had moved to Missoula, MT in 1992 and the town was just flat out Griz football crazy. Not really knowing anything about 1aa football, I loved to make fun of the locals. Little did I know, they were just beginning a 20 year plus playoff run with 6 NC appearances (winning 2) and just playing some great football.
Well, it wasn't long before I became a fan of FCS football and I will defend it to the death now. There is some VERY good football going on in that level. NDST has become a beast. I'm not sure if there are any FBS teams left out there that are willing to play them. It's been a little while since they've lost one of those games.
Anyway, now for something completely different.
 


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