Orangeyes Daily Articles for Wednesday - for Football | Syracusefan.com

Orangeyes Daily Articles for Wednesday for Football

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No recent Cali or Iggy awards; Mr Irrelevant
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Welcome to World Spagetti Day!

Spaghetti, a long, cylindrical, and thin pasta made of milled wheat and water, is celebrated today. Its name comes from an Italian word meaning "thin string" or "twine." The first written record of pasta is in the Talmud, which dates to the fifth century CE. It mentions dried pasta that could be cooked by being boiled. A popular theory claims that spaghetti was invented in China and Marco Polo brought it to Venice, but it is more likely that spaghetti was originally created in Sicily more than 500 years before his time. Arabs occupied Sicily in the seventh century CE, and brought a meal called itriyya, which was described as a "dry pasta". This is likely where spaghetti came from. In a geographical survey of Sicily and surrounding regions called the Book of Roger, commissioned by Sicily's monarch King Roger II and published by Muhammad al-Idrisi in 1154, a long strand hard wheat pasta is mentioned. It was manufactured in large quantities in the Sicilian town of Trabia and exported to other regions. This is the first definitive historical record of spaghetti production.

SU News

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Syracuse Orange defensive lineman Caleb Okechukwu (93) celebrates sacking Pittsburgh Panthers quarterback Kedon Slovis (9) at Acrisure Stadium, Pittsburgh, PA Saturday November 5, 2022. Scott Schild | sschild@syracuse.com Scott Schild

SU defensive lineman Caleb Okechukwu returning for sixth season (PS; Leiker)

Syracuse football will return some key experience and size on its defensive line next season.

Caleb Okechukwu announced Saturday that he’ll return for a sixth season, posting a parody of Michael Jordan’s famous “I’m back” fax sent to reporters when he announced his return to the NBA in 1995.

Okechukwu became a full-time starter this season as SU lost all of its D-line starters from 2021. He had appeared in every game for the past two seasons, though.

I’m Coming Back to make it CLEAR! #mobbb #2023 #imback #LLMD pic.twitter.com/TfHPS3VxFv
— Caleb Okechukwu (@IamCaleb_18) December 31, 2022

The defensive end finished with 48 total tackles, 10 of which were for loss, seven sacks, two forced fumbles and an interception he turned into a pick-6 in the Orange’s narrow 32-29 win over Purdue. He more than doubled his tackle numbers from each of the past two seasons and had never had more than one sack in a year.

Syracuse looks to return all three of its defensive line starters with Okechukwu’s announcement, as both defensive tackle Kevon Darton and other defensive end Jatius Geer have remaining eligibility. Backups Elijah Fuentes-Cundiff and Kevin Jobity both have several years of eligibility, too.


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Wax On! Marlowe Announces Return for 2023 Season - Syracuse University Athletics (cuse.com)

Standout linebacker Marlowe Wax is set to return for the 2023 season, bolstering an Orange defensive unit that returns stars at every level.

The Orange's leading tackler in 2022, he was an honorable mention All-ACC selection this season. Fellow Mob Podcast member Caleb Okechukwu announced his return for next season earlier this week as well.


The linebacking corps will lose Mikel Jones to the NFL Draft, but Stefon Thompson will be back after suffering a season-ending injury, plus Derek McDonald, Anwar Sparrow, Leon Lowery and Kadin Bailey, who all spent time atop the depth chart this season at various points due to injuries in the position.

Okechukwu's return means that players combining for 38 of a possible 39 starts on the defensive line from this year are back next season, plus DT Terry Lockett, who missed the last 10 games of the season due to injury after starting the season atop the depth chart.


Greenwood's Josiah Jeffery signs with Syracuse (indexjournal.com; Estremera)

Josiah Jeffery was having a big summer.

He was going into his senior year at Greenwood High School where he was coming off an extremely successful junior campaign, leading the Eagles on defense with 78 total tackles, eight tackles for a loss, three sacks, a forced fumble, a fumble recovery and an interception.

He was at a South Carolina camp when he felt a twinge in his knee. What was originally believed to be an ACL tear turned out to be a bone bruise, giving the senior a chance to play his senior year.

Despite missing the final month and a half of summer training, Jeffery was himself when he stepped on the field for the first time this season against AC Flora.

“At the beginning, it was rocky. I didn’t know if I was going to play my senior year or not,” Jeffery said. “I just attacked every situation. Being positive with my doctors, my teammates and my family, everyone stuck beside me. I got a good result at the end being able to play. Once I got back on my two feet, I knew there wasn’t going to be any stopping.

“I had to go. I had to train harder and had to work extra because being hurt put me in a hole. I knew I had to get out of there some way. Just sitting back and being sorry wasn’t going to do it. Me and coach (Chris) Liner talked about it every week that someone was going to give me a chance, and Syracuse most definitely did.”

With all his hard work, Jeffery’s dream became a reality in late December, when he committed to Syracuse. On Tuesday, Jeffery had a chance to have his moment surrounded by his family, friends and coaches, as he held his official signing day at Greenwood High School.
...


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Syracuse long snapper Aaron Bolinsky (50) pals around with a staff member before warming up for a game against N.C. State on Nov. 17, 2021. Bolinsky will pursue an NFL career. N. Scott Trimble

Aaron Bolinsky is officially moving on from Syracuse to pursue NFL career (PS; Leiker)

Aaron Bolinsky’s time with Syracuse football is up, but he’ll be working to continue his football career at the next level.

Bolinsky announced on New Year’s Day that he’ll be pursuing an NFL career and declaring for the 2023 NFL Draft. He did not have any remaining collegiate eligibility after playing for the Orange for five years.

Forever Orange pic.twitter.com/NndLhouhvZ
— Aaron Bolinsky (@aaron53bolinsky) January 2, 2023

Bolinsky has been snapping for Syracuse’s all-time leading scorer, kicker Andre Szmyt, for the entirety of his collegiate career after taking over the starting role after an injury to Matt Keller in Sept. 2018. He started a total of 42 games for SU.

There are now seven total Orange players declared for the draft: Bolinsky, Sean Tucker (RB), Mikel Jones (LB), Garrett Williams (CB), Chris Elmore (FB), Devaughn Cooper (WR) and Matthew Bergeron (OL).


Syracuse transfer safety Ja’Had Carter commits to Ohio State football (cleveland.com; Baird)

As Ohio State football prepares to lose a handful of veteran defensive backs, it added one with Power 5 starting experience on Tuesday night.

Former Syracuse safety Ja’Had Carter announced via Twitter that he has committed to the Buckeyes. He was considered one of the top uncommitted players currently in the transfer portal.

Carter started 10 of the Orange’s 12 games this season for a team that started 6-0 before losing five straight. He totaled 35 tackles, three interceptions and six passes defended. He started 27 of 31 games over his three seasons, collecting 135 tackles, five interceptions, 12 passes defended and one fumble forced.

Carter will have three years of eligibility remaining due to the blanket waiver given to all players for the 2020 pandemic season.

Ohio State safety Ronnie Hickman already announced he intends to enter the NFL Draft. Tanner McCalister and Josh Proctor both finished their fifth seasons. Third-year Lathan Ransom is eligible for early entry into the 2023 NFL Draft.
...


WMU football picks up commitment from former Syracuse lineman (mlive.com; Nothaft)

After losing six players to Power Five football teams via the transfer portal, Western Michigan added one to its own roster for the upcoming season.

Former Syracuse offensive lineman Chad Schuster announced his commitment to WMU on Monday over offers from Northern Illinois, Eastern Michigan, Ball State and Bowling Green, among others.

The 6-foot-5, 255-pound Schuster entered the transfer portal on Dec. 12, after spending his true freshman season at Syracuse. He didn’t see any game action in 2022 and will have four seasons of eligibility at WMU beginning with the 2023 campaign.

Rated as a three-star prospect coming out of Franklin High School in Wisconsin, Schuster picked Syracuse over offers from much of the Mid-American Conference, though WMU wasn’t one of the teams to offer him before his commitment to the Orange.
...


Ex-Syracuse football center calls plays for first time (SU, CNY in the NFL) (PS; Herbert)

Former Syracuse football center Justin Outten got to call plays for the first time in his pro career Sunday.

Outten, the offensive coach for the Denver Broncos, took over play-calling under interim head coach Jerry Rosburg in this weekend’s 27-24 loss to the Kansas City Chiefs. Nathaniel Hackett, who was fired after a 4-11 start in his first season as head coach, previously called offensive plays before passing the baton to quarterbacks coach Klint Kubiak in late November as a last-ditch effort to turn things around.

The Broncos had 339 yards of total offense and 3 touchdowns under Outten, including Syracuse native Latavius Murray’s 12 carries for 56 yards and four catches for another 16. However, it still wasn’t enough to beat the Chiefs, who are now tied with the Philadelphia Eagles for the NFL’s best record at 13-3.

The Broncos are already out of the playoffs, so it gives Outten a chance to show Denver (or another team) his potential for next season.

Outten was an offensive lineman for the Orange from 2003-06 during the coaching transition from Paul Pasqualoni to Greg Robinson, and began his coaching career as a graduate assistant under Robinson. This is Outten’s first year as an offensive coordinator; he was previously tight ends coach for three seasons at Green Bay with Hackett, a former assistant under Doug Marrone with Syracuse University and the Buffalo Bills.
...


New state law clarifies rules around NIL deals for student-athletes (waer.org; Shiroff)

A new state law helps Division I colleges like Syracuse University better understand rules around the financial deals that student-athletes can now make.

College athletes have been able to earn money off their name, image, and likeness — or NIL — since July 2021, but many details were never clarified. Now, new legislation that went into effect Sunday is eliminating the confusion around the responsibilities of universities.

The law's most significant provision prohibits any school, conference or other organization with oversight on collegiate athletics from punishing a player for making money off their name, image or likeness.

Additionally, the legislation requires schools to set up programs to help student-athletes thrive in their sport, the classroom and life after college. These programs could include mental health resources, a financial distress fund for student-athletes, leadership training, and degree completion assistance.

Gov. Kathy Hochul signed the bill into law in late November, saying she was proud to enact legislation that gives student-athletes the recognition they deserve.

"Our collegiate student athletes are heroes on the field - and they deserve to be treated like heroes even after the final whistle," Hochul said in a news release. "For too long, collegiate student athletes have not been able to benefit from the extraordinary benefits their hard work has provided to their schools."

The law only applies to Division I schools.


Director of Performance Nutrition - Football (sujobopps.com)

Job #039302
Department Code34102-7021
DepartmentAthletics
Job TitleDirector of Performance Nutrition - Football
LocationSyracuse NY
Pay RangeCommensurate with experience
Staff LevelS5
FLSA StatusExempt
HoursStandard University business hours

8:30am – 5:00pm (academic year)
8:00am – 4:30pm (summer)

Hours may vary based on operational needs. Evening and weekend hours will be required.
Job TypeFull-time
CampusSyracuse, NY
Unionized Position CodeNot Applicable
Job DescriptionThe Director of Performance Nutrition for Football will create, administer, and monitor the nutrition program for all football student-athletes at Syracuse University. This individual will perform dietary assessments and counseling for all football student-athletes, create nutrition programs specific to each athlete, and track the outcomes of the goals set in place. The Director of Performance Nutrition will work closely with the coaching staff, strength & conditioning staff, sports medicine staff, and performance chefs to ensure alignment of objectives on all nutrition and recovery matters. This individual will provide direction in planning all team meals during the playing season, offseason, and for all team travel. He/she will develop educational materials, provide nutrition education discussions, cooking demonstrations, and one-on-one guidance, for all football student-athletes.
Qualifications
  • Bachelor’s degree in nutrition (or related field) required. Must be a registered dietitian. Master’s degree preferred.
  • Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics (CSSD) preferred.
  • Minimum of one (1) year experience in a football setting.
  • Strong computer, presentation, communication, and technology skills.
Job Specific Qualifications
  • Awareness of and sensitivity to the nutrition needs, athletic and social pressures faced by student athletes at the collegiate level.
  • Compliance with FERPA and HIPAA.
  • Knowledge of rules and regulations of athletic governing bodies: e.g., National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), U.S. Anti- Doping Agency (USADA), World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), regarding banned drugs and restricted substances.
  • Ability to establish and maintain cooperative working relationships with culturally diverse students and staff.
  • Knowledge of NCAA and ACC rules and a commitment to rules compliance.
  • Experience in the recruitment of student athletes.
  • Ability to multi-task and meet requirements under pressure with great attention to detail.
  • Willingness to work extended hours.
  • Ability to work autonomously and make sound judgments independently
  • Must possess the ability to meet project deadlines and work under time constraint pressures.
  • Good organizational, communication and computer skills.
  • Strong commitment and ability to work well with student-athletes.
  • Strong written and verbal communication skills.
  • Working knowledge of social media platforms.
Responsibilities
  • Create, administer, and monitor the nutrition program for all football student-athletes at Syracuse University.
  • Perform dietary and body composition assessments and create individual nutrition goals for all football student-athletes. Track and document all corresponding data and results.
  • Work in coordination with team chef, campus catering, and all outside entities that are involved with team meals to develop balanced meal plans to ensure proper nutrition, recovery, and individualized goals for each student athlete. Manage the inventory and staffing of all team fuel stations.
  • Participate in recruiting events by providing presentations to prospective student-athletes and parents.
  • Create educational presentations, materials, and cooking demonstrations for all football student athletes.
  • Provide one-on-one conversations and assist in the nutrition management plans for each student athlete.
  • Other duties as assigned.
Physical Requirements*
Tools/Equipment*
Application InstructionsIn addition to completing an online application, please attach a resume and cover letter.
About Syracuse UniversitySyracuse University is a private, international research university with distinctive academics, diversely unique offerings and an undeniable spirit. Located in the geographic heart of New York State, with a global footprint, and nearly 150 years of history, Syracuse University offers a quintessential college experience.

The scope of Syracuse University is a testament to its strengths: a pioneering history dating back to 1870; a choice of more than 200 majors and 100 minors offered through 13 schools and colleges; nearly 15,000 undergraduates and 5,000 graduate students; more than a quarter of a million alumni in 160 countries; and a student population from all 50 U.S. states and 123 countries. For more information, please visit www.syracuse.edu.
About the Syracuse areaSyracuse is a medium-sized city situated in the geographic center of New York State approximately 250 miles northwest of New York City. The metro-area population totals approximately 500,000. The area offers a low cost of living and provides many social, cultural, and recreational options, including parks, museums, festivals, professional regional theater, and premier shopping venues. Syracuse and Central New York present a wide range of seasonal recreation and attractions ranging from water skiing and snow skiing, hiking in the Adirondacks, touring the historic sites, visiting wineries along the Finger Lakes, and biking on trails along the Erie Canal.
EEO StatementSyracuse University is an equal-opportunity, affirmative-action institution. The University prohibits discrimination and harassment based on race, color, creed, religion, sex, gender, national origin, citizenship, ethnicity, marital status, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression, veteran status, or any other status protected by applicable law to the extent prohibited by law. This nondiscrimination policy covers admissions, employment, and access to and treatment in University programs, services, and activities.
Commitment to Supporting and Hiring VeteransSyracuse University has a long history of engaging veterans and the military-connected community through its educational programs, community outreach, and employment programs. After World War II, Syracuse University welcomed more than 10,000 returning veterans to our campus, and those veterans literally transformed Syracuse University into the national research institution it is today. The University’s contemporary commitment to veterans builds on this historical legacy, and extends to both class-leading initiatives focused on making an SU degree accessible and affordable to the post-9/11 generation of veterans, and also programs designed to position Syracuse University as the employer of choice for military veterans, members of the Guard and Reserve, and military family members.
Commitment to a Diverse and Inclusive Campus CommunitySyracuse University maintains an inclusive learning environment in which students, faculty, administrators, staff, curriculum, social activities, governance, and all other aspects of campus life reflect a diverse, multi-cultural, and international worldview. The University community recognizes and values the many similarities and differences among individuals and groups. At Syracuse, we are committed to preparing students to understand, live among, appreciate, and work in an inherently diverse country and world made up of people with different ethnic and racial backgrounds, military backgrounds, religious beliefs, socio-economic status, cultural traditions, abilities, sexual orientations and gender identities. To do so, we commit ourselves to promoting a community that celebrates and models the principles of diversity and inclusivity.
Quick LinkDirector of Performance Nutrition - Football
Job Posting Date01/03/2023

ACC News

Hot Board: Possibilities for Florida State defensive back coaching vacancy (tomahawknation.com;Multiple Illiterates)


Florida State head coach Mike Norvell finds himself in somewhat unfamiliar territory in his Seminoles tenure: seeking to replace an assistant coach after defensive backs coach Marcus Woodson was hired by the Arkansas Razorbacks.

Norvell has only been in this position three times before in Tallahassee, having to quickly replace TJ Rushing, his initial DB coach hire, when Rushing was poached by Jimbo Fisher’s Texas A&M Aggies. That vacancy was filled by Woodson.

Last season, Norvell elevated Alex Atkins to offensive coordinator and Tony Tokarz to quarterback coach to fill vacancies when Kenny Dillingham left to be Oregon’s offensive coordinator. In addition, linebacker coach Chris Marve left to be the defensive coordinator at Virginia Tech, with Randy Shannon being promoted from an off-field analyst role.

In all those instances, Norvell either promoted from within, or relied on direct staffing ties from the past.

Will he repeat that route, or will this be a true national search?

Tomahawk Nation’s Three Stars are temporarily stepping out of the recruiting realm. Josh Pick, Tim Scribble, and NoleThruandThru are here to offer up some names to watch and why each name might and might not be the next DB coach for FSU.

Defensive Back Coach Hot Board

  • Aazaar Abdul-Rahim, Associate Head Coach/DB coach/Defensive Passing Game Coordinator, Boston College Eagles
Why Abdul-Rahim might be the next FSU defensive back coach?

NT&T: I’ve been banging this drum for almost as long as Jajuan Seider, as far as assistant coaches I’d like to see at FSU. “AAR” is 46 years old and learned under Nick Saban at Alabama and Mike Locksley at Maryland, so he knows how to recruit effectively. He’s also a proven developer, as his defensive backs at Boston College constantly play above their prep rankings.

Why Abdul-Rahim might not be the next FSU defensive back coach?

Tim: Currently we haven’t been able to find any connection between the current Florida State staff and Abdul-Rahim. Would Norvell branch out and connect with an unfamiliar coach?

Why Torrian Gray might be the next FSU defensive back coach?

NT&T: At 48 years old, Gray already has over two decades of experience coaching defensive backs at Virginia Tech, Florida, and South Carolina, and professionally for the Chicago Bears and Washington Redskins. The Lakeland, FL native is an effective recruiter with deep ties to the Sunshine State and has developed over a dozen NFL defensive backs.

Why Torrian Gray might not be the next FSU defensive back coach?

Tim: Similar to Abdul-Rahim, there’s not an immediately noticeable crossover of Gray and Norvell or his staff. If Norvell operates as he has previously, Gray wouldn’t fit. Additionally, although the Gamecocks saw improvement in their secondary, Gray was previously let go at Florida after his unit was consistently torched.

Why Chip West might be the next FSU defensive back coach?

Tim: When the opening was announced, the first thought I had was which of FSU’s opponents have shown a strong defensive backfield? The team that immediately popped in my head was Syracuse. They have two big names in the portal (safety Ja’Had Carter and cornerback Duce Chestnut) that teams are pursuing and before his injury, Garrett Williams was considered one of the top cornerbacks in the ACC. In his first two seasons at Syracuse, West had every starter (at corner) earn All-ACC honors. In his time at Virginia, he was named the 247 Sports ACC recruiter of the year in 2011. Is there an FSU connection? Yes, shared time with current FSU offensive coordinator Alex Atkins at Charlotte in 2018.



Why Chip West might not be the next FSU defensive back coach?

JP: Because Norvell watched his Seminole wideouts stiff-arm West’s corners all the way to Ithica when they played earlier this season.
...


A refresher on Clemson's 2023 football schedule (theclemsoninsider.com; Potter)


Clemson is just a few days into the offseason, but it’s never too early to look ahead to next season.

In fact, the majority of Clemson’s 2023 schedule has been finalized – and has been for a while. The Tigers’ conference opponents were revealed back in the summer as part of the ACC’s new scheduling model. There was also a recent change to the Tigers’ non-conference slate for next season.

Here’s a refresher on what we know about the Tigers’ schedule for next season:

The Tigers will likely start with a conference opponent again. Who that will be has yet to be determined, but Clemson already has its four non-conference games on the docket, including two scheduled for the second and third weekends in September. So unless one of those games is moved up, the Tigers will play an ACC opponent on the season’s opening weekend.

It would be the second time in a five-year span that Clemson opens back-to-back seasons with an ACC foe. Clemson, which beat Georgia Tech to begin this season, will try to extend its eight-game winning streak in league openers, the longest conference-opener win streak in program history.

Clemson is trading one in-state FCS foe for another. The Tigers were originally slated to play Wofford during the non-conference portion of its schedule, but after the Terriers recently added Pitt to their ‘23 schedule, Clemson replaced them with Charleston Southern.

CSU will make the trip to Memorial Stadium on Sept. 9 while the Wofford game will be rescheduled for a later year, Clemson athletic director Graham Neff recently told The Clemson Insider. CSU joins Florida Atlantic (Sept. 16), Notre Dame (Nov. 4) and South Carolina (Nov. 25) on Clemson’s non-conference schedule.
...


Other

45BGWZPYTRF7ZD6A4DEYAB546A.jpg

This is the site map submitted to the town of Cicero for Metro North.

Central NY town nixes $100 million project that called for 278 apartments, townhomes (PS; $; Doran)


The Cicero Town Board has voted against a zone change in a bustling part of the municipality, essentially blocking a project that included 278 apartments and townhomes.

The Apex at Metro North was proposed for 32 acres behind EchoPark Automotive, near Wegmans and Walmart on Brewerton Road (Route 11) in Cicero. It would have been built in two phases. The first included traditional housing, the second, senior housing.



The developer, Troy-based United Group of Companies, wanted to build 150 multi-family units, spread over two, four-story buildings with private garages and two garden-style buildings. In addition, the developer wanted to construct three townhome clusters, with each cluster having 12 to 13 townhomes. A clubhouse and other amenities were included.

Cicero town board members, however, had numerous concerns about the density of the project and its impact on traffic in the area. In mid-December, the board turned down the developer’s request for a zone change from regional commercial to planned unit development.

That rejection comes as Onondaga County Executive Ryan McMahon is ramping up plans for housing and commercial development related to the massive semiconductor project planned in the nearby town of Clay.
...
 

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