Is Coleman's career severely limited with the torn meniscus? | Syracusefan.com

Is Coleman's career severely limited with the torn meniscus?

Dave85

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Both my knees have torn meniscus. I have had one knee scoped. But even with the operation both my knees kill me when I do anything physical. I get a lot of bone on bone rubbing and it's very painful. The exercise bike and weight lifting machines help but it never heals. I still get bone on bone pain. If I play basketball I can barely walk the next day. So I have a lot of experience with this type of injury. I hope Coleman can do something meaningful with his career. But this is the second year now where Coleman has knee issues. I think I remember he had issues in High School also. This will probably mean much more playing time for McCullough if can actually graduated HS and become college eligible. And it may change the coach's priority to be more interested in getting one of the following guys: Diagne, Diallo, Bryant, or Silva.
 
Both my knees have torn meniscus. I have had one knee scoped. But even with the operation both my knees kill me when I do anything physical. I get a lot of bone on bone rubbing and it's very painful. The exercise bike and weight lifting machines help but it never heals. I still get bone on bone pain. If I play basketball I can barely walk the next day. So I have a lot of experience with this type of injury. I hope Coleman can do something meaningful with his career. But this is the second year now where Coleman has knee issues. I think I remember he had issues in High School also. This will probably mean much more playing time for McCullough if can actually graduated HS and become college eligible. And it may change the coach's priority to be more interested in getting one of the following guys: Diagne, Diallo, Bryant, or Silva.
Coleman has a bruised knee and McCullough already graduated.
 
one our forum Sports Medicine Doctors diagnosed it, and one of our forum Coaches told him he couldn't play.

So they lied to the paper and we outed it on this forum? That's smart. I must have missed the thread. Or was it nuked because it shouldn't have been posted in the first place? This thread won't last long either, I imagine, unless the University made the info public knowledge themselves.
 
So they lied to the paper and we outed it on this forum? That's smart. I must have missed the thread. Or was it nuked because it shouldn't have been posted in the first place? This thread won't last long either, I imagine, unless the University made the info public knowledge themselves.
Pete keep it under your hat.
 
Coleman has a bruised knee and McCullough already graduated.

Glad to hear you know 100% Coleman's knee is not a long term injury or issue. Wow, what a relief.

Also, I'm glad to hear McCullough is eligible to play.
 
Coleman has a bruised knee and McCullough already graduated.

""Right now we're treating it," Boeheim said after Syracuse's 70-48 win over Eastern Michigan. "He's going through a series of treatments that we hope will help him be able to play. It's kind of day-by-day, not week-to-week, it's really day-to-day.He had a treatment yesterday so he couldn't play today."

Coleman was averaging 5.1 points and 4.6 rebounds through the first 11 games of the season, but he played just six minutes in SU's win over Villanova on Dec. 28. He had a noticeable limp and did not play after halftime of that game.

Coleman's injured knee is the same one in which he needed surgery to repair the meniscus last year. However, his current injury is not related to last year's injury."

http://www.syracuse.com/orangebasketball/index.ssf/2014/01/syracuses_dajuan_coleman_doubt.html

"A meniscus tear is a common injury to the cartilage that stabilizes and cushions the knee joint. The pattern of the tear can determine whether your tear can be repaired. See a picture of different types of tears . Radial tears sometimes can be repaired, depending on where they are located. Horizontal, flap, long-standing, and degenerative tears-those caused by years of wear and tear-generally cannot be repaired."
 
Interesting article about knee injuries and treatment. It was in the NY Times last week.

I'll post the lead in...because...some don't subscribe to the Times and either don't like it or they don't want to waste a view on an article they might not want to read.

Common Knee Surgery Does Very Little for Some, Study Suggests
By PAM BELLUCK
A popular surgical procedure worked no better than fake operations in helping people with one type of common knee problem, suggesting that thousands of people may be undergoing unnecessary surgery, a new study in The New England Journal of Medicine reports.

The unusual study involved people with a torn meniscus, crescent-shaped cartilage that helps cushion and stabilize knees. Arthroscopic surgery on the meniscus is the most common orthopedic procedure in the United States, performed, the study said, about 700,000 times a year at an estimated cost of $4 billion.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/26/h...very-little-for-some-study-suggests.html?_r=0
 
Lack of finish around the basket (with limited other o-skills) and an inability to find an effective spot in the 2-3 were already severe limitations regardless of what his injury status is.

If he busts, I feel bad for DC (and worse if injuries contribute to it). I can see why he wanted to go with the local power but doubtful it was the right fit (nor was UK). But at the end of the day our success rate on recruits has been extremely good so no complaints.
 
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jncuse said:
Lack of finish around the basket (with limited other o-skills) and an inability to find an effective spot in the 2-3 were already severe limitations regardless of what his injury status is. If he busts, I feel bad for DC (and worse if injuries contribute to it). I can see why he wanted to go with the local power but doubtful it was the right fit (nor was UK). But at the end of the day our success rate on recruits has been extremely good so no complaints.


I don't think UK was a very good fit either, actually a way worse fit than we were.

If he doesn't improve, I'm wondering if he's the biggest bust we've had? Can't recall anybody rated that high who produced so little, even this early into it.
 
DC2 will be fine. He's refining his game. Unfair to compare to progress to a guard. Guards in college are required do almost what they used to do in high school. The responsibilities are similar (I know I'm generalizing). Centers in high school are used to destroying everyone because they are the tallest and biggest guys on the floor. They can have poor form and still be dominate.

You can see he's trying to eliminate the urge to put the ball on the floor when he gets it on the block. It's muscle memory for him, but he'll be fine. If he is healthy, I expect him to improve immensely as the year goes on.
 
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Right now I honestly wonder, is the fact he's been carrying so much weight on his frame for so long causing so much stress on his joints and limbs that he is doomed to a career filled with injury after injury, specifically of the knee and back variety?
 
I'd love for DC2 to develop because the dude is a rebounding machine but part of me wonders if we're better starting Grant and giving DC2's minutes to Roberson.
 
If DC2's injury prevents him from playing, has he played in too many games to redshirt? If he has injuried knees, IHMO, his pro prespects drop so he might stay around for at least his full 4 years if not a 5th after a redshirt.
 
when people near 300 pounds and approaching 7 feet tall start having knee / foot issues before they are twenty..the outcomes are seldom good .
 
when people near 300 pounds and approaching 7 feet tall start having knee / foot issues before they are twenty..the outcomes are seldom good .

However, hope still abounds. Onuaku was putting up some nice numbers in the NBDL to the point where he was called up by the Pelicans. He's back in the NBDL again, but he is healthy finally:

http://www.nba.com/dleague/playerfile/arinze_onuaku/
 
Interesting article about knee injuries and treatment. It was in the NY Times last week.

I'll post the lead in...because...some don't subscribe to the Times and either don't like it or they don't want to waste a view on an article they might not want to read.

Common Knee Surgery Does Very Little for Some, Study Suggests
By PAM BELLUCK
A popular surgical procedure worked no better than fake operations in helping people with one type of common knee problem, suggesting that thousands of people may be undergoing unnecessary surgery, a new study in The New England Journal of Medicine reports.

The unusual study involved people with a torn meniscus, crescent-shaped cartilage that helps cushion and stabilize knees. Arthroscopic surgery on the meniscus is the most common orthopedic procedure in the United States, performed, the study said, about 700,000 times a year at an estimated cost of $4 billion.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/26/h...very-little-for-some-study-suggests.html?_r=0

They're referring to older folks who have a degenerative meniscal tear, arthritis, and pain without symptoms suggestive of a meniscus tear. I obviously don't have
The whole story but I don't think that applies to Coleman.
 

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