Strength and Conditioning Program | Page 3 | Syracusefan.com

Strength and Conditioning Program

In spite of his personal accolades I feel it's just another area where the school and program is a decade behind the elite programs in.

Strength, conditioning, nutrition, diet, recovery

We are making strides, but we are still far off.

Some schools use their kinesiology and physiology academic programs to provide real world experiences and provide practical skill and curriculum for their students
 
I agree about the nurtition but any good coach should know what that particular kid needs and what he needs to improve. All Lifting coaches should know about nutrition and how it impacts their program they set up for the kid. Its literally hand to hand. U wont be good without 1 or the other.

The coach tells them.

Big guys have an interesting relationship with food. You can tell em what to eat, but if so n so wants 2 pizzas, another wants 40 wings, and another prefers 3 deserts a night? That falls on them.

You can preach accountability, but the guys have to buy in, too. Late night team meetings sometimes involved team takeout... Is Chik Filet the best choice? (Same after games)

When there is time, its tough to get a kid to whip up some boiled chicken breast and fresh broccoli. They often choose take out. Eating quick, isn't always eating healthy. Especially if the kid can't cook for a lick. Others have blown their stipends, and spent weeks eating Ramen. Other than breakfast, they are often left to their own devices. Time, $$, schedule are a factor.
 
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The coach tells them.

Big guys have an interesting relationship with food. You can tell em what to eat, but if so n so wants 2 pizzas, another wants 40 wings, and another prefers 3 deserts a night? That falls on them.

You can preach accountability, but the guys have to buy in, too. Late night team meetings sometimes involved team takeout... Is Chik Filet the best choice? (Same after games)

When there is time, its tough to get a kid to whip up some boiled chicken breast and fresh broccoli. They often choose take out. Eating quick, isn't always eating healthy. Especially if the kid can't cook for a lick. Others have blown their stipends, and spent weeks eating Ramen. Other than breakfast, they are often left to their own devices. Time, $$, schedule are a factor.
Dont they have a training table. I thought they got to eat on the schools three or more times a day including weekends
 
Dont they have a training table. I thought they got to eat on the schools three or more times a day including weekends
It was pretty much just breakfast. For early practice, some guys left directly for class, and missed breakfast. Some didn't eat more than a snack until 2 or 3.. (can't eat in class)

A 2019 survey of 3500 D1 athletes showed that 24% suffered from food insecurity.

About half of the athletes described above were assessed at the lowest level of food security, meaning they were cutting the size of their meals, skipping meals, and/or going without food for a day or more because of a lack of money. (Quote from survey)

Its a college athlete problem.

Its really easy to say nutrition. Finding a way is far more difficult with scheduling(they have no time) $$, and accountability.
 
It was pretty much just breakfast. For early practice, some guys left directly for class, and missed breakfast. Some didn't eat more than a snack until 2 or 3.. (can't eat in class)

A 2019 survey of 3500 D1 athletes showed that 24% suffered from food insecurity.

About half of the athletes described above were assessed at the lowest level of food security, meaning they were cutting the size of their meals, skipping meals, and/or going without food for a day or more because of a lack of money. (Quote from survey)

Its a college athlete problem.

Its really easy to say nutrition. Finding a way is far more difficult with scheduling(they have no time) $$, and accountability.
Thanks for shining a light on a widely misunderstood topic.
 
It was pretty much just breakfast. For early practice, some guys left directly for class, and missed breakfast. Some didn't eat more than a snack until 2 or 3.. (can't eat in class)

A 2019 survey of 3500 D1 athletes showed that 24% suffered from food insecurity.

About half of the athletes described above were assessed at the lowest level of food security, meaning they were cutting the size of their meals, skipping meals, and/or going without food for a day or more because of a lack of money. (Quote from survey)

Its a college athlete problem.

Its really easy to say nutrition. Finding a way is far more difficult with scheduling(they have no time) $$, and accountability.
there's just not enough money to feed the kids
 
Thanks for shining a light on a widely misunderstood topic.
Not just a Cuse issue. D1 athlete issue.

The fix? Dunno. If there was dinner at Manley? If ya gotta hop a bus, it'll take you an hour, or more. Thats less sleep, or less study, for kids that don't get enough sleep until Thursday night, in the first place. I suppose they could make every athletes meal, and deliver 100 up to skytop/UV, but that doesn't mean Mr 3 dessert, is going to eat it. Or skip dessert. (Thats on him)

In season, before meetings, you could make team dinner mandatory(less sleep/study) Doesnt fix not having enough time for breakfast. Unless you want to deprive the whole team another 30 minutes of much needed sleep, so early class guys can eat. We've had starting Linemen losing weight, in season, because of this. Its an insanely demanding schedule. The answers aren't always easy.
 
Idk. Is the NCAA archaic enough that they can't serve pre made meals to the kids rooms for breakfast, lunch, and dinner?

Are they able to schedule a team breakfast before classes start? Work kids schedules around so their first classes are 9:45 /10a?

A couple kids in my dorm, freshman year, worked their schedule so they 9nlu had Tuesday / Thursday classes. Off MWF. Granted their T/The was full day, but being free five days a week was a good trade off
 
Yeah i get ya but its part of process in my head anyways. Yes we should still have a nutritionist and they should all make the plan together. When i did the lifting at our local hs, i talked to the coaches and tried to tell me what they need to improve on physically wise and tried as much as i could to help or talk to the kds about eating a certain way would help them get where they wanted to go. Didnt always work but hey i tried.
That makes total sense. I imagine at lower levels being a jack of all trades is more common. I would guess prior to the addition of nutrition staff you probably saw more of that with S&C coaches.
 
I think pointing to SE’s personal accomplishments as evidence that he is a good S&C coordinator is a bit ridiculous. The proof that he was not good at leading the S&C program was on the field. We consistently had one of the least athletic and weakest teams in power 5. We consistently had G5 teams physically match us. Part of that is recruiting, but a lot of it has to do with how you maximize a kid’s potential. If you are not very good at identifying potential and you don’t maximize what potential is there then you get the product we watched for the past eight years.

Personal accolades are great, but that’s what they are: personal. Stuff that worked for you is not going to work for everyone. Can you now train and motivate 100 players to find and do exactly what they need to to be successful on the field? The results on the field say that SE was one of the worst in the conference. Just my two cents.
 
Idk. Is the NCAA archaic enough that they can't serve pre made meals to the kids rooms for breakfast, lunch, and dinner?

Are they able to schedule a team breakfast before classes start? Work kids schedules around so their first classes are 9:45 /10a?

A couple kids in my dorm, freshman year, worked their schedule so they 9nlu had Tuesday / Thursday classes. Off MWF. Granted their T/The was full day, but being free five days a week was a good trade off
Archaic? Of course. An institution following rules from a larger institution. FUBAR. If a kid needs a class for his degree, and it's at 8, he needs to go. Should practice start at 5:30 AM(minus warm ups) When the kid gets home from meetings past midnight?

It wasnt too long ago, that schools received permission to give kids a "to go" bag... If straight to class, and they can't eat in class.. well...

If allowed. Giving kids a day of prepped food is a great idea. If allowed. Expensive. 4 minutes in the microwave could work.

Some schools schedule their kids in 15 minute intervals- from wake up to bed. Time management is huge. Every spare minute - sleep or study.

SnC is often the scapegoat. Takes YEARS to fix a kid that was weak, coming in. Technique, form, and scheme also play in. Bergeron was weak coming in - 3 years til he could rep 315. (Had 1/2 dozen in our HS over 300) Schmidt gave him good form/technique.

Coach E wasn't responsible for a couple of our starters (oline), only benching 225, (squating squat) coming in. That's 2, or in Bergs case, 3 years before they can put another plate on. And then you have 3 or 4 more years until they can add another plate. 405. Now you have power.

Elko and Addazio used running schemes to put their guys in better positions.

Injuries can come with how you practice. If you are an undisciplined team, and practice that way? What do you think will happen?

Maybe E could have done some things different. Pretty standard for CFB, with a very good, modern approach to fast twitch, and flexibility.

Fran sees lack of push. (We all do) I think he fixes the run, partially with scheme. Bleich was benching 455 in HS, squating over 600.. Another guy, too. A couple years in, Servais was repping over 400. We didn't utilize that. I'm guessing Fran runs a power scheme, on run(Elko, Addazio, Baylor when he was there) Those guys had a distinct advantage - in the right scheme. (They could pancake almost anyone in drive blocking)

The other way he fixes it? (If you aren't a T , DE) Is bring in guys that did the work in HS. Skip the guys that didn't.

I'm well aware of many College lifting programs. My only beef with E? When a seasoned HS lifter comes in, E was a form Nazi. (Refuses to hurt a single kid) Form Nazi, is good, BTW. You can figure that out in a few short weeks. Less if the kid demonstrates competition form. He makes you prove it for a few months. The kid winds up with a "prove it again" Lull for the 1st 2 or 3 months. (Safety). Then its on. I happen to disagree.

Snc is a scapegoat. Nutrition? Is not.
 
I have no idea if Sean E was good or not, but it makes sense Fran wants to bring in his own guys. These S&C guys spend just as much, if not more, time with these players than their positional coaches do. Fran needs someone he can fully trust, and that's probably not a hold over from the previous staff. Especially if Fran is trying to establish a certain culture that Sean may not fit into.
 
Not just a Cuse issue. D1 athlete issue.

The fix? Dunno. If there was dinner at Manley? If ya gotta hop a bus, it'll take you an hour, or more. Thats less sleep, or less study, for kids that don't get enough sleep until Thursday night, in the first place. I suppose they could make every athletes meal, and deliver 100 up to skytop/UV, but that doesn't mean Mr 3 dessert, is going to eat it. Or skip dessert. (Thats on him)

In season, before meetings, you could make team dinner mandatory(less sleep/study) Doesnt fix not having enough time for breakfast. Unless you want to deprive the whole team another 30 minutes of much needed sleep, so early class guys can eat. We've had starting Linemen losing weight, in season, because of this. Its an insanely demanding schedule. The answers aren't always easy.
Ok i get that. what about having each kid send pick of their meal into lifting coaches or sit down with said schedule and say they make 2 meals a day, they cant grab 2 other meals plus their 2 protien shakes depending on their needs. Breakfast has some lunch meats so grab a sourdough turkey sandwich with some veges on it for lunch and throw a shake in a few hours after lunch and then dinner grab a protien low carb meal for at night when their hungry. i dont know really but their are ways to do it. Diet is so much of the weight program. When i was lifting a lot, i made all my crap for three days and had it all set up to take with me. If they plan a proper schedule they can do it. Depends on how bad they want it.
 
Archaic? Of course. An institution following rules from a larger institution. FUBAR. If a kid needs a class for his degree, and it's at 8, he needs to go. Should practice start at 5:30 AM(minus warm ups) When the kid gets home from meetings past midnight?

It wasnt too long ago, that schools received permission to give kids a "to go" bag... If straight to class, and they can't eat in class.. well...

If allowed. Giving kids a day of prepped food is a great idea. If allowed. Expensive. 4 minutes in the microwave could work.

Some schools schedule their kids in 15 minute intervals- from wake up to bed. Time management is huge. Every spare minute - sleep or study.

SnC is often the scapegoat. Takes YEARS to fix a kid that was weak, coming in. Technique, form, and scheme also play in. Bergeron was weak coming in - 3 years til he could rep 315. (Had 1/2 dozen in our HS over 300) Schmidt gave him good form/technique.

Coach E wasn't responsible for a couple of our starters (oline), only benching 225, (squating squat) coming in. That's 2, or in Bergs case, 3 years before they can put another plate on. And then you have 3 or 4 more years until they can add another plate. 405. Now you have power.

Elko and Addazio used running schemes to put their guys in better positions.

Injuries can come with how you practice. If you are an undisciplined team, and practice that way? What do you think will happen?

Maybe E could have done some things different. Pretty standard for CFB, with a very good, modern approach to fast twitch, and flexibility.

Fran sees lack of push. (We all do) I think he fixes the run, partially with scheme. Bleich was benching 455 in HS, squating over 600.. Another guy, too. A couple years in, Servais was repping over 400. We didn't utilize that. I'm guessing Fran runs a power scheme, on run(Elko, Addazio, Baylor when he was there) Those guys had a distinct advantage - in the right scheme. (They could pancake almost anyone in drive blocking)

The other way he fixes it? (If you aren't a T , DE) Is bring in guys that did the work in HS. Skip the guys that didn't.

I'm well aware of many College lifting programs. My only beef with E? When a seasoned HS lifter comes in, E was a form Nazi. (Refuses to hurt a single kid) Form Nazi, is good, BTW. You can figure that out in a few short weeks. Less if the kid demonstrates competition form. He makes you prove it for a few months. The kid winds up with a "prove it again" Lull for the 1st 2 or 3 months. (Safety). Then its on. I happen to disagree.

Snc is a scapegoat. Nutrition? Is not.
I agree but i alsodidnt like the form our former lifting coach allowed. U could pretty much get away with anything as long as bar is moving and i feel ur weaknesses should be trained to strengths. I think him being a Nazi on form was him not trusting any h.s. coaches training tips. Its really not rocket science. i wonder how much idividuaility they allow in each program. Do all lineman do same lifts. If your a hip driven guy and im a leg driven guy, will they use weights to help u drive better with your legs and help me with my hips or no. I dont know how specific they get.
 
Ok i get that. what about having each kid send pick of their meal into lifting coaches or sit down with said schedule and say they make 2 meals a day, they cant grab 2 other meals plus their 2 protien shakes depending on their needs. Breakfast has some lunch meats so grab a sourdough turkey sandwich with some veges on it for lunch and throw a shake in a few hours after lunch and then dinner grab a protien low carb meal for at night when their hungry. i dont know really but their are ways to do it. Diet is so much of the weight program. When i was lifting a lot, i made all my crap for three days and had it all set up to take with me. If they plan a proper schedule they can do it. Depends on how bad they want it.
If the ncaa allows it, they should do whatever is possible. If you're lifting/on a diet, you need a food prep day. I'll spend 2 or 3 hours on that - just for me.

Not sure if restrictions have been lifted. They didn't want athletes eating lobster and caviar, while others were not. Or something like that. Ncaa rules are/were weird.
 
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I agree but i alsodidnt like the form our former lifting coach allowed. U could pretty much get away with anything as long as bar is moving and i feel ur weaknesses should be trained to strengths. I think him being a Nazi on form was him not trusting any h.s. coaches training tips. Its really not rocket science. i wonder how much idividuaility they allow in each program. Do all lineman do same lifts. If your a hip driven guy and im a leg driven guy, will they use weights to help u drive better with your legs and help me with my hips or no. I dont know how specific they get.
Bad form = getting hurt in the gym. Form Nazi's are annoying, but they protect your body.

I'm not sure how individual, the lifting plan was. Many lifts will be the same, regardless. Mixing it up is normal.

HC is going to want his guy running SnC. Nutrition can be the larger challenge.
 
Not just a Cuse issue. D1 athlete issue.

The fix? Dunno. If there was dinner at Manley? If ya gotta hop a bus, it'll take you an hour, or more. Thats less sleep, or less study, for kids that don't get enough sleep until Thursday night, in the first place. I suppose they could make every athletes meal, and deliver 100 up to skytop/UV, but that doesn't mean Mr 3 dessert, is going to eat it. Or skip dessert. (Thats on him)

In season, before meetings, you could make team dinner mandatory(less sleep/study) Doesnt fix not having enough time for breakfast. Unless you want to deprive the whole team another 30 minutes of much needed sleep, so early class guys can eat. We've had starting Linemen losing weight, in season, because of this. Its an insanely demanding schedule. The answers aren't always easy.
In a perfect world, the team lives in one building with a team specific dining center on the first floor with a controlled menu. I wonder if any programs out there have that as a model?
 
I'm curious what "upgrading the food in the dining hall for the players" looks like, both as a fat guy, and a curious fan.
Otto, Why don't you email Tori and ask what changes have been made? vbrown03
vbrown03

The site doesn't want to print the entire address if it wipes it out again it is at sign, the first three letters in Syracuse followed by the first three in education.


I'm including the article about her when she was hired:


Meghan Hendricks | Photo Editor​

Syracuse became the last school in the ACC to hire a nutritionist this spring by bringing in Tori Brown, a local product and former West Virginia football dietician
By Connor Smith SENIOR STAFF WRITER

9 months ago

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Before spring practice started last month, Jatius Geer sat down with Tori Brown, Syracuse’s new director of performance nutrition. After weighing 227 pounds last year, Geer put on an additional 25 to 30 pounds by himself in the offseason. He wanted to maintain that weight and turn it into muscle. So Geer went to Brown, talking about what to eat daily and what weight he wants to be at by September. Brown now helps Geer plan his exact breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.

Geer was one of the players who pushed head coach Dino Babers to bring in a team nutritionist. Mikel Jones publicly opened that discussion last summer at Atlantic Coast Conference Kickoff, and multiple players confirmed this spring they wanted the program to make the hire for years.

Syracuse hired Brown in early March, making it the last ACC school to add a team nutritionist. The Orange struggled with injuries last season, losing six starters for the year and several others for multiple games. Babers said Tuesday his main goal for Friday night’s spring game is keeping all his players healthy. Players said Brown has made a quick impact. Since her hiring, she’s focused on preventing injuries along with players eating and drinking right to get to an ideal weight.

“It’s been great. Tori came in, and she changed everything,” wide receiver Trebor Pena said. “She’s only been here for a couple of weeks or a month, but everybody can already tell the difference.”

Tori Brown is Syracuse’s new nutrionist, being hired last month after serving as a football dietician at West Virginia. COURTESY OF WEST VIRGINIA ATHLETICS
Brown graduated from Christian Brothers Academy and spent last season as West Virginia’s football dietician. She previously worked at Pitt in the football and basketball sports nutrition departments for three years. An SU spokesperson declined to make Brown available for this story.

Syracuse’s announcement of Brown’s hiring said she is responsible for performing dietary assessments and creating nutrition programs for all football players. She also works closely with coaches, performance chefs and the sports medicine and strength and conditioning staff.

Team-focused dieticians or nutritionists (the only major difference between the two is the certification process) can also provide “evidence-based guidance” to help ensure healthy weight or body composition changes. They also help plan meals on road trips, said Jessica Garay, an assistant professor in Falk College’s Department of Nutrition and Food Studies.

“When we’re at this level of D-I, Power Five conferences, all of the players are really talented,” Garay said. “So you’re looking for these other ways to make sure that you’re properly supporting the players to get the best out of them. And I think of nutrition — along with things like sleep and mental health and hydration — as these ‘X-factors.’”

In the age of NIL and the transfer portal, having a team-specific nutritionist can also help recruiting efforts. Each ACC school has at least one nutritionist or dietician in its athletic department, and all but one program that finished in last year’s top 25 have one as well. Veronica Tearney, SU’s director of strength and conditioning for Olympic sports, helps with nutrition in the athletic department, but doesn’t work with football.

“They’re things that you’re not going to necessarily focus on in your training and practices, but they make a huge difference in terms of how the guys feel, and how well they’re going to be able to perform,” Garay said.

Before Brown, Syracuse’s football strength coach, Sean Edinger, was responsible for strength, conditioning and nutrition simultaneously, Garay said. A nutritionist can provide significantly more individualized nutrition and hydration advice than strength coaches, who don’t have the time for that, Garay added.

“We’re one of the later schools to acquire one, and I think we’ve got a good one,” Babers said on April 4. “It’s something that we’ve needed, and now, she’s already off and running with our players and it’s gonna be a huge advantage for us.”

Brown made quick changes after arriving. Before, players had the choice of eating with the team or taking food to-go, Pena said. Now, it’s mandatory for players to sit and eat during team dinners, ensuring they’re getting the proper food. Brown makes sure players eat before and after practice, defensive lineman Kevon Darton said.

The expectation for a team nutritionist is that players can stay healthy and avoid injuries, they said. That comes through staying hydrated, eating well and avoiding certain meals, but also by stretching and taking ice and warm baths, defensive back Isaiah Johnson said. Since Syracuse practices early in the morning — typically starting around 8 a.m. — getting enough sleep is difficult, but important, Johnson added.

“I would say everybody looks a little more healthy with Tori here,” quarterback Carlos Del Rio-Wilson said. “Some players are coming out full speed, no holding back, with Tori putting nutrients and vitamins in our body.”



Arlo Stone | Design Editor​

Syracuse has numerous players trying to gain, lose or maintain weight, Johnson said, and Brown has been crucial. Wide receiver Oronde Gadsden II said he talked with Brown about what food and supplements to take to stay healthy. Enrique Cruz Jr. said having a nutritionist helps “tremendously” with the offensive line’s development by ensuring players eat enough healthy food.

“I’ve been super happy about it,” linebacker Marlowe Wax said. “You can just feel the energy around her, and how happy the team is with her being here. It’s definitely a big thing.”

Brown’s hiring had been a long time coming, said Garay, who recognized the need after arriving in Syracuse in 2005. She was surprised SU was one of the few major conference programs without any full-time sports dieticians despite having strong athletic and nutrition programs.

Garay said she presented a proposal outlining the duties of a dietician for all sports to a Syracuse athletic department administrator several years ago. There was interest, she said, but was told it was a budgetary decision not to create a new position.

There was some headway made on creating the position a few years ago, but those conversations “died completely” when the COVID-19 pandemic hit, Garay said. Brainstorming sessions with athletic department officials included the details of the position, how the person would work with existing people in athletics and how to work with students in the nutrition program.

The newly renovated Lally Athletics Complex has two cafeterias — one for football, and one for all other sports — which furthered the need for a nutritionist, Garay said.

Syracuse lost several key players — including Garrett Williams and Chris Elmore — for the season last year, and others, like Garrett Shrader, missed time too. Shrader also missed last year’s spring game with a mild hamstring injury suffered in practice, and later said he should’ve drank more water beforehand.

In November, Babers said the injury numbers were concerning and warranted the need to evaluate “everything.” A week later, Director of Athletics John Wildhack told syracuse.com SU was in the process of hiring a dietician and making other enhancements to alleviate the injury problem.

“We’re not quite sure what happened last year,” Babers said on March 21. “I’ve been around a long time. I’ve never had a year like that. And you know, sometimes it’s just happening. But if it happens twice, it’s not.”

Babers said Syracuse investigated the problem and changed some things in the weight room and in other areas, declining to share specifics.

With those changes now in place, Babers and SU will await the results. The Orange return 17 of their 22 starters — ninth-best nationally — in addition to a slew of players who missed time during last year’s 7-6 season. The hope is that Brown can help Syracuse improve in 2023.

“Now that we have (Brown), it just feels like we’re taking another step to being one of those teams that has a nutritionist (and is) just competing with everybody else,” Wax said.
 
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Yeah, diet is definatly 60 to 70 percent of your plan. Did u guys use bands and chains a lot or no. Cory Parker had my son using them often. amazing tools.
That's funny - on my cruise diet was 100% of my plan.
even after 40 miles of walking the drinking and steak outweighed it
 

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