Does Syracuse Trail Every ACC School in Sports Nutrition? | Page 2 | Syracusefan.com

Does Syracuse Trail Every ACC School in Sports Nutrition?

BillSU

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Well they aren’t going to build an athletes cafeteria on south campus. I don’t know when but I believe the long term plan is to get everyone to main campus.
Bees, I don't know how much you understand about the history of SU football and where the players lived and ate but this entire thread brought a lot back to me for discussion. It seems very logical for the long term plan to be on campus so the players can get to where they have to go for classes and other events easily.

When I walked on it was back in the sixties. When practice was over, everyone showered and climbed in a buses in the back of Manley and we were taken to a cafeteria style place to eat in the basement of Slocum Hall on College Place. This was when you were issued a meal ticket and a cashier punched your ticket at check out before you sat down to eat. The food was good but a nutritionist was far in the future.

The "Meal Ticket" turned into a mini scandal that changed how players ate. What happened was players sold their tickets for as much as they could get to anyone. The scandal was found out and players were assigned a dorm for food. Dorm food, imo, leaves many things to be desired but they ate it or nothing. I joined Sig Ep as all fraternities had excellent food prepared by hired local chefs both male and female.

ALSO:

Players at that time also lived in student housing. My friend, a running back, used to sleep in as did many players but all still got A's in all his classes so there was more to this than food.

PS: The Alston-related payments are in addition to the cost-of-attendance payments athletes receive. In 2015, the Power 5 conferences passed a rule to allow scholarships to include the full cost of attendance, which includes food, housing, travel etc
 

Cuse#1

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I am proud to say that I was just watching a podcast with John wildhack talking about we will have a licensed dietitian by July and it's about time because it just puts us on even ground with the rest of the power 5 teams in terms of having a nutritionist so we can eliminate that problem and hopefully all those November woes + injuries that just pile up at a alarming rate and most of the time there's severe so I am psyched 2 see what that will bring to the program and eliminate or at least minimize the problems that caused these November woes, losses.
 

qdawgg

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I am proud to say that I was just watching a podcast with John wildhack talking about we will have a licensed dietitian by July and it's about time because it just puts us on even ground with the rest of the power 5 teams in terms of having a nutritionist so we can eliminate that problem and hopefully all those November woes + injuries that just pile up at a alarming rate and most of the time there's severe so I am psyched 2 see what that will bring to the program and eliminate or at least minimize the problems that caused these November woes, losses.

Is the 1 in your name stand for 1 sentence?
 

orangenauburn

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So breaking it down, glad they finally are addressing some issues, but:

Hired by July - so seven months from now. Will probably take a year to get his program up and running and also a lag in seeing the results from said program.

Why so long to get this going?
 

whobut03

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So breaking it down, glad they finally are addressing some issues, but:

Hired by July - so seven months from now. Will probably take a year to get his program up and running and also a lag in seeing the results from said program.

Why so long to get this going?

Head count was not available for 22-23 academic year. Will be accounted for in 23-24 academic year.
 

All4SU

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Am I the only one who thinks we spend too much time, money, resources, energy catering to the every need and whim of college athletes?
 

HRE Otto IV

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So breaking it down, glad they finally are addressing some issues, but:

Hired by July - so seven months from now. Will probably take a year to get his program up and running and also a lag in seeing the results from said program.

Why so long to get this going?

This is a bit overblown. The macros have been out there for ages. It isn't like a nutritionist has knowledge of dark arts. And they can't micro manage all 100 kids, just like the strength coach cannot. As Random was saying the other day, it is more about food access than food knowledge.
 

qdawgg

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This is a bit overblown. The macros have been out there for ages. It isn't like a nutritionist has knowledge of dark arts. And they can't micro manage all 100 kids, just like the strength coach cannot. As Random was saying the other day, it is more about food access than food knowledge.

So much wrong with this. It is the dark ages when you’re letting kids make decisions about what they eat. Why can’t a nutritionist manage 100 kids. Are they not coming to campus with a computer? This “stuff” isn’t difficult. I’m not a nutritionist, although I started that at college before switching majors. But I could make a nutrition plan for 100 kids pretty easily. I could also, without much trouble, make sure when they go to the dining hall they get the nutrition that meets their needs. It would also not be an issue making sure they get the proper nutrition before/after practices and created to match the intensity and length of practices.

And the strength coach better be managing what every player does in the weight room. It’s like in the school I work at and the soccer team spends 80% of their weight room time doing curls and bench presses. I want to puke in my mouth watching it. A college strength coach better be micromanaging all the players too.

This is simple stuff.
 

HRE Otto IV

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So much wrong with this. It is the dark ages when you’re letting kids make decisions about what they eat. Why can’t a nutritionist manage 100 kids. Are they not coming to campus with a computer? This “stuff” isn’t difficult. I’m not a nutritionist, although I started that at college before switching majors. But I could make a nutrition plan for 100 kids pretty easily. I could also, without much trouble, make sure when they go to the dining hall they get the nutrition that meets their needs. It would also not be an issue making sure they get the proper nutrition before/after practices and created to match the intensity and length of practices.

And the strength coach better be managing what every player does in the weight room. It’s like in the school I work at and the soccer team spends 80% of their weight room time doing curls and bench presses. I want to puke in my mouth watching it. A college strength coach better be micromanaging all the players too.

This is simple stuff.

They cannot babysit every kid. You can tell them what to do but you aren't there to spoon feed them. The kids should all have a plan. That isn't hard to do and you don't need a full time football nutritionist to create a plan. One for the entire AD would suffice. If we aren't already currently giving kids a plan, that is a reason for concern.

I am not saying that nutrition is not important. I am not saying that having a nutrition plan is not important. What I am saying is that having a football nutritionist isn't going to make a huge difference.

Do you really think kids are being told you need to eat this exact meal at this exact time? How do you make sure they follow the plan to a T and make sure they actually are doing what they say they are? You don't think kids will falsify a food log?

These are 18-22 year old kids. The biggest issue is getting them to eat enough. Ideally that would be as clean as possible, but that isn't realistic.
 

qdawgg

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They cannot babysit every kid. You can tell them what to do but you aren't there to spoon feed them. The kids should all have a plan. That isn't hard to do and you don't need a full time football nutritionist to create a plan. One for the entire AD would suffice. If we aren't already currently giving kids a plan, that is a reason for concern.

I am not saying that nutrition is not important. I am not saying that having a nutrition plan is not important. What I am saying is that having a football nutritionist isn't going to make a huge difference.

Do you really think kids are being told you need to eat this exact meal at this exact time? How do you make sure they follow the plan to a T and make sure they actually are doing what they say they are? You don't think kids will falsify a food log?

These are 18-22 year old kids. The biggest issue is getting them to eat enough. Ideally that would be as clean as possible, but that isn't realistic.

Yes and no. Of course you can only monitor so much. But if they eat a large portion of their meals at the dining hall for football players/athletes it would be pretty easy to monitor. Which sounds like it would be significantly better than what’s happening now. During the season it would be easier to monitor some of these things as well. So having a dedicated football nutritionist would make a huge difference. Making sure what they should eat is available by itself.
 

HRE Otto IV

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Yes and no. Of course you can only monitor so much. But if they eat a large portion of their meals at the dining hall for football players/athletes it would be pretty easy to monitor. Which sounds like it would be significantly better than what’s happening now. During the season it would be easier to monitor some of these things as well. So having a dedicated football nutritionist would make a huge difference. Making sure what they should eat is available by itself.

You don't need a specific football only nutritionist for that. You can have a nutritionist create meal options. Those can be given to the chef and the kids can have choices in the dining hall. You don't need a football specific person there in the dining hall with a clipboard.

We should already be using plans and food logs. Then reviewing every 1-2 weeks. If we are not, then we are behind.

I wonder are teams allowed to require quarterly blood work on kids? Or is that too medical? The could be hidden deficiencies even with proper nutrition.
 

Cuse#1

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Good, get that hump Coach E out of there
I was definitely happy to hear that there would be finally a nutricionist here on campus and the biggest thing is that we were the only one that didn't have 1 and that Is negative publicity in terms of recruiting whatever who knows I'm sure all these guys know about this and use that against us And I can't help but wonder about these November just collapses and I can't help but think that it will help In one way or another am I expecting a miracle no but I think we will be on an even playing field when it comes to that that's all I want
 

Oakland

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I think sports nutrition is maybe the 12th or 23th most important issue for SU's competitiveness.
 

jr4750

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Job is posted.

 

BillSU

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Wildhack last week was on Epsn radio, and he mentioned that they are gonna review the strength program and nutrion position at seasons end, and make changes. It was a response to a Question asking why we always have so many injuries every season.
And so they did.

Happy to see the post for The Director of Nutrition for football. But, the requirements of that post, IMO, are going to require an assistant(s)/staff to the Director. Keeping track of just one of the requirements...
" This individual will perform dietary assessments and counseling for all football student-athletes, create nutrition programs specific to each athlete, and track the outcomes of the goals set in place."

The above alone entails keeping detailed records to keep on each player 85 - 100 of them and review them with each player to determine if their plan is benefiting each one. No way one person is handling that. The job description contiues:

The Director of Performance Nutrition will work closely with the coaching staff, strength & conditioning staff, sports medicine staff, and performance chefs to ensure alignment of objectives on all nutrition and recovery matters. This individual will provide direction in planning all team meals during the playing season, offseason, and for all team travel. He/she will develop educational materials, provide nutrition education discussions, cooking demonstrations, and one-on-one guidance, for all football student-athletes.

With the other requirements of planning each meal daily/weekly ordering the food from suppliers seeing that players are getting great, balanced meals that are nutritionally beneficial from the right sources, I think that is too much for one person. You need a Director and a staff - how many is a question. I've added below what the University of Georgia is doing, Jen Ketterly can't handle it all.


The link above is about this topic and how Georgia and others in the SEC are handling their football program. I am going to post just a bit of it that speaks to what I'm concerned about.

>>>Free safety Connor Norman didn't think about nutrition when he played football before transferring to Georgia.

"It wasn't something you really thought of in high school when you prepare for a game," he said.

The Georgia football program changed all that.

"I didn't really have any knowledge on nutrition," Norman said. "What you fuel your body with and what you put in your body has a big deal with how you perform."

Having access to Georgia's nutrition staff has helped educate him on the importance of eating to sustain energy, he said. So much so that he decided to pursue a degree in exercise science.

Nutrition directors are a relatively new addition to the brain trust that grooms elite athletes for collegiate competition. Most teams have had nutrition and diet experts on staff four years or less.

Now nutrition is in the spotlight for athletes, as it is for everyone else.

"Look at our obesity rates - it's obviously a struggle," said Jen Ketterly, director of sports nutrition at the University of Georgia.

"There are over 100 people on the football team and there is just one of me," Ketterly said. "I wouldn't say that right now I have the luxury of giving each individual a specialized meal plan."

She counsels as many players as possible, especially if they are changing positions or trying to reach a personal weight goal.

When it comes to football, playing position determines portion control, said Jamie Meeks, the sports nutritionist for the LSU Tigers.

"The linemen's calorie (intake) needs are a lot higher, not because they're more active but because they're bigger guys," Meeks said.

The linemen need those extra calories to help maintain their weight and build throughout the season.

The rule of thumb on game day is for players to eat heartily three and four hours before they hit the field. Pastas, bread, grains and potatoes are the mainstays of an athlete's diet during the season.

"Carbohydrates are always going to be our base energy supplier," Ketterly said.

"I want to make sure I have several options of carbohydrates for the players to eat," said Tara Gidus, who works with athletes at the University of Central Florida.

Although the school is outside of the SEC, the previously unranked football team sky-rocketed to No. 21 in the Week 8 Associated Press polls after it's surprising win against Louisville, which was ranked eighth before that game. They are now ranked seventeenth, losing only one game this season.

At LSU, Meeks pays close attention to body composition and what the individual's position requires in terms of energy output and sheer size. These needs change during the school year.

"During the offseason, they're going to focus more on proteins and vegetables and reaching their goal weight," said Meeks.


Food is not the whole story for elite athletes. Hydration is key for sports nutritionists because adequate water intake keeps players healthy and helps to prevent cramping during games.

"I've been having them drink as much as possible," Gidus said, "they're drinking before and after practice, they're drinking during practice, they're drinking all the time." The prevailing advice for players is to 'drink until they're peeing clear.'

Nutrition directors in the SEC are mostly women and they are new additions to a world dominated by men. They've developed a sense of camaraderie and communicate often about issues and struggles they face on the job. Their arrival has forced college athletes to focus more on what they are putting into their bodies, and to consider how proper nutrition can advance their own goals.

Bragg, Alabama's director of sports nutrition, said she knows a thing or two about helping players achieve goals: The Crimson Tide have won three of the last four national titles.

"Athletic and coaching talent win championships," Bragg says. "Nutrition helps both players and coaches perform optimally."
 
Last edited:

HRE Otto IV

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And so they did.

Happy to see the post for The Director of Nutrition for football. But, the requirements of that post, IMO, are going to require an assistant(s)/staff to the Director. Keeping track of just one of the requirements...
" This individual will perform dietary assessments and counseling for all football student-athletes, create nutrition programs specific to each athlete, and track the outcomes of the goals set in place."

The above alone entails keeping detailed records to keep on each player 85 - 100 of them and review them with each player to determine if their plan is benefiting each one. No way one person is handling that. The job description contiues:

The Director of Performance Nutrition will work closely with the coaching staff, strength & conditioning staff, sports medicine staff, and performance chefs to ensure alignment of objectives on all nutrition and recovery matters. This individual will provide direction in planning all team meals during the playing season, offseason, and for all team travel. He/she will develop educational materials, provide nutrition education discussions, cooking demonstrations, and one-on-one guidance, for all football student-athletes.

With the other requirements of planning each meal daily/weekly ordering the food from suppliers seeing that players are getting great, balanced meals that are nutritionally beneficial from the right sources, I think that is too much for one person. You need a Director and a staff - how many is a question. I've added below what the University of Georgia is doing, Jen Ketterly can't handle it all.


The link above is about this topic and how Georgia and others in the SEC are handling their football program. I am going to post just a bit of it that speaks to what I'm concerned about.

>>>Free safety Connor Norman didn't think about nutrition when he played football before transferring to Georgia.

"It wasn't something you really thought of in high school when you prepare for a game," he said.

The Georgia football program changed all that.

"I didn't really have any knowledge on nutrition," Norman said. "What you fuel your body with and what you put in your body has a big deal with how you perform."

Having access to Georgia's nutrition staff has helped educate him on the importance of eating to sustain energy, he said. So much so that he decided to pursue a degree in exercise science.

Nutrition directors are a relatively new addition to the brain trust that grooms elite athletes for collegiate competition. Most teams have had nutrition and diet experts on staff four years or less.

Now nutrition is in the spotlight for athletes, as it is for everyone else.

"Look at our obesity rates - it's obviously a struggle," said Jen Ketterly, director of sports nutrition at the University of Georgia.

"There are over 100 people on the football team and there is just one of me," Ketterly said. "I wouldn't say that right now I have the luxury of giving each individual a specialized meal plan."

She counsels as many players as possible, especially if they are changing positions or trying to reach a personal weight goal.

When it comes to football, playing position determines portion control, said Jamie Meeks, the sports nutritionist for the LSU Tigers.

"The linemen's calorie (intake) needs are a lot higher, not because they're more active but because they're bigger guys," Meeks said.

The linemen need those extra calories to help maintain their weight and build throughout the season.

The rule of thumb on game day is for players to eat heartily three and four hours before they hit the field. Pastas, bread, grains and potatoes are the mainstays of an athlete's diet during the season.

"Carbohydrates are always going to be our base energy supplier," Ketterly said.

"I want to make sure I have several options of carbohydrates for the players to eat," said Tara Gidus, who works with athletes at the University of Central Florida.

Although the school is outside of the SEC, the previously unranked football team sky-rocketed to No. 21 in the Week 8 Associated Press polls after it's surprising win against Louisville, which was ranked eighth before that game. They are now ranked seventeenth, losing only one game this season.

At LSU, Meeks pays close attention to body composition and what the individual's position requires in terms of energy output and sheer size. These needs change during the school year.

"During the offseason, they're going to focus more on proteins and vegetables and reaching their goal weight," said Meeks.

Food is not the whole story for elite athletes. Hydration is key for sports nutritionists because adequate water intake keeps players healthy and helps to prevent cramping during games.

"I've been having them drink as much as possible," Gidus said, "they're drinking before and after practice, they're drinking during practice, they're drinking all the time." The prevailing advice for players is to 'drink until they're peeing clear.'

Nutrition directors in the SEC are mostly women and they are new additions to a world dominated by men. They've developed a sense of camaraderie and communicate often about issues and struggles they face on the job. Their arrival has forced college athletes to focus more on what they are putting into their bodies, and to consider how proper nutrition can advance their own goals.

Bragg, Alabama's director of sports nutrition, said she knows a thing or two about helping players achieve goals: The Crimson Tide have won three of the last four national titles.

"Athletic and coaching talent win championships," Bragg says. "Nutrition helps both players and coaches perform optimally."
All this stuff has been around awhile and already in use. You are making this out to be way bigger than it is. SU was already doing most of this.
 

orangenauburn

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it doesn’t take a year to pick up groceries at wegmans. Where do you come up with this stuff?
To get all the data points in place and tracking trends and show progress and growth amongst 100+ athletes doesn't happen over night.

There needs to be individual discussions with the athletes about current diet habits and trainings programs secondary to whatever the programs have them in.

From there, there needs to be an analysis and assessment of the body type and what their metabolic rates are, how many calories they need, what type of calories and food they need.

This takes time to get in place when you have over 100 people you are doing this for.

There's monitoring progress and tracking that needs to happen. Adjustments need to be made.

So that's where I come up with this stuff.
 

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