Top 10 G5 Coaches ready for a move to P5 | Syracusefan.com

Top 10 G5 Coaches ready for a move to P5

IthacaMatt

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OK, this is from another one of those mouth breather web sites, but are there any viable candidates in this group, which at first glance skews to southern schools. Are there one or two of these 10 guys who might be a good fit? I don't want any more P5 coordinators. That would be a step backwards. Other suggestions (maybe more MAC guys?) are welcome.

= = = = = = ========

Remember, this is a fun exercise and even if your favorite coach is ranked near the bottom of his conference’s list: A) He’s still considered a damn good football coach to have said job and B) That doesn’t mean I hate your team!

With that, this list is totally subjective. It’s my rankings. Some might weigh the overall body of work for a head coach. I take that into account, but college football has become the ultimate what-have-you-done-for-me-lately-business with the carousel constantly spinning.

The job of a head coach has changed in recent years, too. So for my rankings, I take into account recent performance, recruiting chops, hiring quality assistants, sending players to the NFL, working the transfer portal, etc.

Today, I look at the Top 10 2023 Group of Five/non-Notre Dame Independent head coaches. This list would’ve looked much differently just last season, but Luke Fickell, Hugh Freeze, Gus Malzahn and others are all at Power 5 programs now.

While the top of the rankings aren’t too surprising, the rest of the list is akin to picking your favorite flavor of ice cream.

1. Willie Fritz, Tulane

Willie Fritz engineered the biggest single-season turnaround in FBS history last season, turning a 2-10 Tulane team (with five losses by a touchdown or less) into a 12-2 bunch that won its first conference title in 24 years and beat USC in the Cotton Bowl.

Fritz, 63, has been a head coach since 1993, winning conference championships in junior college (Blinn), Division II (Central Missouri), FCS (Sam Houston State) and FBS (Georgia Southern and Tulane).

2. Jeff Traylor, UTSA

After consecutive Conference USA championships, Jeff Traylor is primed for a future Power 5 head coaching job — perhaps as soon as next season. Traylor is 30-10 at UTSA, winning double-digit games (11, 12) in back-to-back years.

The longtime Texas high school coach would be a perfect fit at many Big 12 jobs.

3. Jamey Chadwell, Liberty

Liberty’s new head coach built Coastal Carolina into a recent Group of 5 power, winning 31 games over the last three seasons with the Chanticleers.

Jamey Chadwell, who runs a modern spread-option offense, has been a head coach at four different schools, winning at least 10 games with three programs. He was in the mix for Georgia Tech’s opening and the move to Liberty looks like his next stepping stone before an eventual P5 job.

4. Jon Sumrall, Troy

Jon Sumrall has just a single season as a head coach, but he debuted in style — losing two of his first three games before leading the Trojans to 11-straight wins including a Sun Belt championship and a victory over UTSA in the bowl game.

The former Kentucky linebacker spearhead a Troy defense that ranked No. 8 nationally in yards per play (4.49) and held opponents under 20 points 10 times.

5. Troy Calhoun, Air Force

Somewhat quietly, Troy Calhoun has established Air Force as the current top football service academy, winning at least 10 games in the program’s last three full seasons.

Calhoun, a former Falcons’ quarterback, is among the longest-tenured coaches in the country. In 16 seasons in Colorado Springs, he has 10 years with at least eight wins and Air Force has won four straight bowl games.


6. Jeff Monken, Army

Jeff Monken is entering his 10th season at Army and is one of the school’s all-time coaches. After a five-year run where Army won at least nine games four times, the Black Knights had a tough 2022 season, going 6-6 — with two victories over FCS schools.

Still, Monken has shown an ability to consistently beat his fellow service academy brethren, winning five of the last seven of Navy and four of six against Air Force. Monken also had a successful tenure at Georgia Southern, winning at least 10 games in three of four seasons with two conference championships.

7. Jeff Tedford, Fresno State

After taking two years off, Jeff Tedford came out of brief retirement to return to Fresno State in 2022 and lead the Bulldogs to a 10-4 season and a Mountain West Conference championship.

In four seasons at his alma mater, Tedford has three seasons with at least 10 wins. He also coached at Cal for 11 years, winning the Pac-12 Championship in 2006.

8. Tom Herman, FAU

Tom Herman was the most difficult coach on this list to rank, as the former Texas and Houston head coach has been away from college football for two years but has a resume that’s better than almost any head coach in the Group of 5.

Now at FAU, Herman was 32-18 at Texas, highlighted by a 10-4 season in 2018 with a Sugar Bowl win over Georgia. He also went 13-1 with an AAC championship in Year 1 at Houston. In six years as a head coach, he’s never had a losing season and has four Top 25 finishes and a perfect 5-0 record in bowl games.

9. Tyson Helton, Western Kentucky

Tyson Helton has won exactly nine games in three of his four seasons as a head coach at WKU. The Hilltoppers have had one of the better offenses in the country during his tenure, especially finding success via transfer quarterbacks.

Bailey Zappe spent a year in the program in 2021 and set NCAA single-season records for yards and touchdowns. Last season, West Florida transfer quarterback Austin Reed put up ridiculous numbers (4,744 yards and 40 touchdowns) and returns to the team this fall.

10. Chris Creighton, Eastern Michigan

Among the most underrated coaches in the country, Chris Creighton took over an EMU program that was considered the worst FBS team in the nation in 2014 — with a combined 20-90 record the previous 10 seasons.

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It’s been a slow-burn rebuild with the Eagles, but Creighton, who was a very successful NAIA, D-III and FCS head coach, delivered the program its second-best season in school history — 131 years — with a 9-4 year in 2022.

After a 7-6 season in 2021, Eastern Michigan had back-to-back winning seasons for just the third time in school history (the first coming in 1986-87) since the program joined the MAC in 1976.

Best of the rest: Mike Houston, ECU; Charles Huff, Marshall; Jason Candle, Toledo

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We cannot make the same mistake and hire a bad fit. Dino was a bad fit. Most of these guys listed are as well. We someone who understands the Northeast.

Yes, I agree. Most of those guys are not the right fit. They skew too south and southwest. I just wanted to start the conversation for guys who know much more about coaching than me.
 
Maybe im just depressed with this game and the way it’s played out the last 4 weeks. But im starting to wonder why any of these coaches would leave where they are to go to a down and out Syracuse program? They have a better shot of getting hired to a better program by staying where they are and what they have built. Need to dig deep for this next hire.
 
Yes, I agree. Most of those guys are not the right fit. They skew too south and southwest. I just wanted to start the conversation for guys who know much more about coaching than me.

Here are a whole bunch of Big 10 assistants considered "on the rise"

The Big Ten's Rising Star College Football Coaches for 2023​

Justin Frye, Offensive Line Coach, Ohio State
Frye's debut in Columbus was a success, as the Buckeyes boasted one of the nation's top offensive lines in college football. This unit allowed only 12 sacks in '22 and cleared the way for rushers to average 5.4 yards per rush. The Indiana native's ability to develop Ohio State's starting five will be tested after the departure of tackles Paris Johnson Jr. and Dawand Jones and center Luke Wypler this offseason.



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Related: Ranking the Big Ten Coaches for 2023

Joe Harasymiak, Defensive Coordinator, Rutgers

Harasymiak took over the play-calling duties for Rutgers' defense in '22 after spending the last four years as an assistant (including co-defensive coordinator from 2021-22) at Minnesota. In his first season with the Scarlet Knights, Harasymiak helped the defense hold teams to 5.2 yards per snap. Also, he previously worked as the head coach at Maine and went 20-15 over three seasons.



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Brian Hartline, Offensive Coordinator/Wide Receivers Coach, Ohio State
Thanks to Hartline's work on the recruiting trail and on the field, the Buckeyes continue to land and develop elite playmakers at receiver. Hartline may also take some of the play-calling duties off of coach Ryan Day's plate in '23.

Aaron Henry, Co-Defensive Coordinator, Illinois
After a standout playing career at Wisconsin, and a short stint in the NFL, Henry quickly moved through the coaching ranks to make stops at Rutgers, NC State, and Vanderbilt before reuniting with his college coach (Bret Bielema) at Illinois. With Ryan Walters off to be the head coach at Purdue, Henry is set to take over the play-calling duties for an Illinois defense that allowed only 4.4 yards per play last fall.


Related: Big Ten Predictions for 2023

Terrance Jamison, Co-Defensive Coordinator/Defensive Line Coach, Illinois

Jamison was promoted to co-defensive coordinator with Aaron Henry after Ryan Walters departed to take the head-coaching position at Purdue. Jamison's work in the trenches helped the Fighting Illini finish third in the Big Ten in fewest rushing yards a game allowed (99.8), while linemen Jer'Zhan Newton and Keith Randolph Jr. have developed into two of the best in college football.


Phil Longo, Offensive Coordinator, Wisconsin
With Longo's background in the Air Raid attack, Wisconsin's offense is going to look a bit different in '23. However, Longo isn't going to abandon the running game in Madison, as his offenses at North Carolina (2019-22) all ranked inside of the top six in the ACC in per-game production. The Tar Heels also never finished lower than third in the ACC in scoring during Longo's four years in Chapel Hill.

Big Ten '23 Preview: Predictions | All-Conference Team | 133 Rankings
Best Transfers | Coach Rankings | All-America Team | Bowl Projections

Jesse Minter, Defensive Coordinator, Michigan

Minter arrived in Ann Arbor after spending the '21 season at Vanderbilt and previously worked in the NFL as an assistant with the Ravens. Under Minter's watch, Michigan held teams to 16.1 points a game and just 4.65 yards a snap last fall.


Related: Ranking All 133 College Football Teams for 2023

Sherrone Moore, Offensive Coordinator/Offensive Line Coach, Michigan

Moore joined Michigan's staff in '18 as a tight ends coach and shifted to the offensive line/co-coordinator role in '21. Under Moore's watch, the Wolverines have won the Joe Moore Award as the nation's best offensive line in each of the last two seasons. Additionally, he's slated to handle the full-time coordinator role in '23.


Joe Rossi, Defensive Coordinator, Minnesota
Rossi took over as the program's interim defensive signal-caller during the '18 campaign and was eventually promoted to the full-time role at the end of the regular season. After giving up 5.93 yards a snap in '18, the Golden Gophers cut that total to 5.1 the following year. Minnesota's defense ranked fourth in the Big Ten in fewest yards per play allowed (4.86) in '21 and ranked sixth last fall (4.98).

JaJuan Seider, Running Backs Coach, Penn State
Seider is regarded as one of the Big Ten's top recruiters and has been instrumental in player development at the running backs position since joining James Franklin's staff in '18. Miles Sanders rushed for over 1,000 yards in Seider's debut, while Nicholas Singleton (1,061 yards) and Kaytron Allen (867) thrived as freshmen in '22.


Related: College Football 2023 All-America Team

Matt Simon, Co-Offensive Coordinator/Wide Receivers Coach, Minnesota

Simon is set to take over the play-calling duties in '23 after working as the team's wide receivers coach since '17. The former Northern Illinois receiver already has experience calling plays for the Golden Gophers, as he worked as the team's primary coordinator in bowl wins against West Virginia ('21) and Auburn ('19). Simon also thrives at developing receivers in Minneapolis, as Tyler Johnson and Rashod Bateman both became stars under his tutelage.


Mike Tressel, Co-Defensive Coordinator/ILB Coach, Wisconsin
Tressel followed head coach Luke Fickell from Cincinnati to Wisconsin and inherits a defense that allowed only 20.2 points a game last year. The Ohio native worked at Michigan State from 2007-20 before landing with the Bearcats prior to the '21 campaign. Under Tressel's direction, Cincinnati finished fifth nationally in fewest points allowed (16.9 last year) in '21 and tied for 20th (20.6) last year.


Tony White, Defensive Coordinator, Nebraska
White joins Nebraska's staff as defensive signal-caller after guiding Syracuse's defense for the last two years and previously had stints at Arizona State, San Diego State, and New Mexico as an assistant. The Orange finished second in the ACC in fewest yards per play allowed (4.91) in '22 and fourth (5.11) under White's direction in the last two seasons.

Related: Ranking All 133 College Football Teams for 2023

Brian Williams, Defensive Coordinator/Defensive Line Coach, Maryland

Williams joined Maryland's staff in '19 and spent time as an assistant working with outside linebackers and the defensive line prior to a promotion to the co-defensive coordinator role and eventually the primary play-caller (for the final two games) in '21. The Terrapins gave up 30.7 points a game and 5.8 yards a snap that season but cut those totals to 23.2 a contest and 5.01 yards a play last fall.


LeVar Woods, Special Teams Coordinator, Iowa
Woods is a big reason why Iowa usually has some of the top special teams in the Big Ten. After playing his college ball with the Hawkeyes and a seven-year career in the NFL as a player, Woods returned to Iowa City as an off-field assistant. He eventually landed the linebackers coach role in '12 before moving to tight ends in '15 and special teams in '18.

Mike Yurcich, Offensive Coordinator, Penn State
Penn State's offense averaged only 25 points a game in Yurcich's debut in '21 but improved significantly last year. The Nittany Lions finished third in the Big Ten in scoring (35.8 points a game) and yards per play (6.2). The Ohio native caught the attention of Oklahoma State coach Mike Gundy after a standout play-calling stint at Shippensburg and spent six years in Stillwater as the program's offensive coordinator. He later worked at Ohio State ('19) and Texas ('20) before coming to Happy Valley.


Other Assistants on the Rise

Tony Alford, Running Backs Coach, Ohio State
Deion Barnes, Defensive Line Coach, Penn State
Winston DeLattiboudere III, Defensive Line Coach, Minnesota
Robby Discher, Special Teams Coordinator, Illinois
Graham Harrell, Offensive Coordinator, Purdue
Mike Hart, Running Backs Coach, Michigan
Scottie Hazelton, Defensive Coordinator, Michigan State
Colin Hitschler, Co-Defensive Coordinator/Safeties Coach, Wisconsin
Kevin Kane, Defensive Coordinator, Purdue
Terrance Knighton, Defensive Line Coach, Nebraska
Barry Lunney Jr., Offensive Coordinator, Illinois
Garret McGuire, Wide Receivers Coach, Nebraska
Grant Newsome, Tight Ends Coach, Michigan
Mark Orphey, Cornerbacks Coach, Rutgers
Greg Scruggs, Defensive Line Coach, Wisconsin
Christian Smith, Defensive Line Coach, Northwestern
Anthony Tucker, Co-Offensive Coordinator, Indiana
 
I've said it several times on here, I think what Creighton has done at EMU is amazing. Don't know if it translates here, but he's proven he can build a winner at arguably the hardest place to win in division 1 football.
 
Bob Chesney, Holy Cross
Curt Cignetti, JMU
Willie Fritz, Tulane
Charles Huff, Marshall
Jamey Chadwell, Liberty
Manny Diaz, Penn St DC
Dan Mullen, Florida/Miss St (fmr)
Rich Rodriguez, Jacksonville St
 
OK, this is from another one of those mouth breather web sites, but are there any viable candidates in this group, which at first glance skews to southern schools. Are there one or two of these 10 guys who might be a good fit? I don't want any more P5 coordinators. That would be a step backwards. Other suggestions (maybe more MAC guys?) are welcome.

= = = = = = ========

Remember, this is a fun exercise and even if your favorite coach is ranked near the bottom of his conference’s list: A) He’s still considered a damn good football coach to have said job and B) That doesn’t mean I hate your team!

With that, this list is totally subjective. It’s my rankings. Some might weigh the overall body of work for a head coach. I take that into account, but college football has become the ultimate what-have-you-done-for-me-lately-business with the carousel constantly spinning.

The job of a head coach has changed in recent years, too. So for my rankings, I take into account recent performance, recruiting chops, hiring quality assistants, sending players to the NFL, working the transfer portal, etc.

Today, I look at the Top 10 2023 Group of Five/non-Notre Dame Independent head coaches. This list would’ve looked much differently just last season, but Luke Fickell, Hugh Freeze, Gus Malzahn and others are all at Power 5 programs now.

While the top of the rankings aren’t too surprising, the rest of the list is akin to picking your favorite flavor of ice cream.

1. Willie Fritz, Tulane

Willie Fritz engineered the biggest single-season turnaround in FBS history last season, turning a 2-10 Tulane team (with five losses by a touchdown or less) into a 12-2 bunch that won its first conference title in 24 years and beat USC in the Cotton Bowl.

Fritz, 63, has been a head coach since 1993, winning conference championships in junior college (Blinn), Division II (Central Missouri), FCS (Sam Houston State) and FBS (Georgia Southern and Tulane).

2. Jeff Traylor, UTSA

After consecutive Conference USA championships, Jeff Traylor is primed for a future Power 5 head coaching job — perhaps as soon as next season. Traylor is 30-10 at UTSA, winning double-digit games (11, 12) in back-to-back years.

The longtime Texas high school coach would be a perfect fit at many Big 12 jobs.

3. Jamey Chadwell, Liberty

Liberty’s new head coach built Coastal Carolina into a recent Group of 5 power, winning 31 games over the last three seasons with the Chanticleers.

Jamey Chadwell, who runs a modern spread-option offense, has been a head coach at four different schools, winning at least 10 games with three programs. He was in the mix for Georgia Tech’s opening and the move to Liberty looks like his next stepping stone before an eventual P5 job.

4. Jon Sumrall, Troy

Jon Sumrall has just a single season as a head coach, but he debuted in style — losing two of his first three games before leading the Trojans to 11-straight wins including a Sun Belt championship and a victory over UTSA in the bowl game.

The former Kentucky linebacker spearhead a Troy defense that ranked No. 8 nationally in yards per play (4.49) and held opponents under 20 points 10 times.

5. Troy Calhoun, Air Force

Somewhat quietly, Troy Calhoun has established Air Force as the current top football service academy, winning at least 10 games in the program’s last three full seasons.

Calhoun, a former Falcons’ quarterback, is among the longest-tenured coaches in the country. In 16 seasons in Colorado Springs, he has 10 years with at least eight wins and Air Force has won four straight bowl games.


6. Jeff Monken, Army

Jeff Monken is entering his 10th season at Army and is one of the school’s all-time coaches. After a five-year run where Army won at least nine games four times, the Black Knights had a tough 2022 season, going 6-6 — with two victories over FCS schools.

Still, Monken has shown an ability to consistently beat his fellow service academy brethren, winning five of the last seven of Navy and four of six against Air Force. Monken also had a successful tenure at Georgia Southern, winning at least 10 games in three of four seasons with two conference championships.

7. Jeff Tedford, Fresno State

After taking two years off, Jeff Tedford came out of brief retirement to return to Fresno State in 2022 and lead the Bulldogs to a 10-4 season and a Mountain West Conference championship.

In four seasons at his alma mater, Tedford has three seasons with at least 10 wins. He also coached at Cal for 11 years, winning the Pac-12 Championship in 2006.

8. Tom Herman, FAU

Tom Herman was the most difficult coach on this list to rank, as the former Texas and Houston head coach has been away from college football for two years but has a resume that’s better than almost any head coach in the Group of 5.

Now at FAU, Herman was 32-18 at Texas, highlighted by a 10-4 season in 2018 with a Sugar Bowl win over Georgia. He also went 13-1 with an AAC championship in Year 1 at Houston. In six years as a head coach, he’s never had a losing season and has four Top 25 finishes and a perfect 5-0 record in bowl games.

9. Tyson Helton, Western Kentucky

Tyson Helton has won exactly nine games in three of his four seasons as a head coach at WKU. The Hilltoppers have had one of the better offenses in the country during his tenure, especially finding success via transfer quarterbacks.

Bailey Zappe spent a year in the program in 2021 and set NCAA single-season records for yards and touchdowns. Last season, West Florida transfer quarterback Austin Reed put up ridiculous numbers (4,744 yards and 40 touchdowns) and returns to the team this fall.

10. Chris Creighton, Eastern Michigan

Among the most underrated coaches in the country, Chris Creighton took over an EMU program that was considered the worst FBS team in the nation in 2014 — with a combined 20-90 record the previous 10 seasons.

e0dd2acd3574679864cd76965aa5dce2.png


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It’s been a slow-burn rebuild with the Eagles, but Creighton, who was a very successful NAIA, D-III and FCS head coach, delivered the program its second-best season in school history — 131 years — with a 9-4 year in 2022.

After a 7-6 season in 2021, Eastern Michigan had back-to-back winning seasons for just the third time in school history (the first coming in 1986-87) since the program joined the MAC in 1976.

Best of the rest: Mike Houston, ECU; Charles Huff, Marshall; Jason Candle, Toledo

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We can't get him as he just took his current job as FAU HC 10 months ago but he is IMO the best coach on the list

A QB PC and OC at The Ohio State University he did an amazing job at UH and very good job at Texas.

Cincinnati native with ties to Texas HS coaches.
He is the perfect age - 48.
Has won big everywhere he has been
 
Chesney Marrone Cignetti Patricia. Long shot due to age Don brown.

need need need someone who gets this region


For anyone holding out, Dino is done question is when now. I hope bandaid is pulled after we lose to bc
 
Sherrone Moore, Offensive Coordinator/Offensive Line Coach, Michigan
Moore joined Michigan's staff in '18 as a tight ends coach and shifted to the offensive line/co-coordinator role in '21. Under Moore's watch, the Wolverines have won the Joe Moore Award as the nation's best offensive line in each of the last two seasons. Additionally, he's slated to handle the full-time coordinator role in '23.
This
 
A lot of our recruiting is in the south, along the Atlantic coast. Chadwell sounds interesting.

I thought SU should’ve looked at him hard last year despite the fact he has only coached in the south (there are few P5 fanbases probably willing to accept an option-like offense). He signed a 7 year deal with Liberty worth $4M+ per year. I doubt SU could attract him now, unless he wants P5 and knows most P5 programs aren’t willing to take a chance on him due to his offense
 
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Itll never happen but i’d love Brian Hartline.
 
what's the situation with Jim Mora at UConn, does he have to be bought out of a contract? That's an impossible job there as an independent. Coaching at a northeast school, at least he understands the landscape
 
Couple things I think I want from the next guy.

1- sustained success at one location. Someone that has built and recruited his own guys. (Babers always did it with other guys players and then jumped ship)

2- Northeast ties/connections. Having in roads in the south is nice. But the new guy has to understand the limitations that we have. Yes we have a dome and perfect football weather. But we can’t recruit our entire team from Florida or Texas. We need to make inroads in Washington, New Jersey, Pennsylvania. Easier to recruit close to home and then pluck guys from Florida and Georgia and Texas when it presents itself.
 
I thought SU should’ve looked at him hard last year despite the fact he has only coached in the south (there are few P5 fanbases probably willing to accept an option-like offense). He signed a 7 year deal with Liberty worth $4M+ per year. I doubt SU could attract him now, unless he wants P5 and knows most P5 programs aren’t willing to take a chance on him due to his offense
We need a northerner.

Macpherson
Pasqualoni
Marrone

Three most successful modern day coaches in SU history. All from tristate/new england area. Not a coincidence. I don't want to hear about how the game has evolved. It's still about relationship building w recruiting, blocking and tackling fundamentals and creating a culture of winning.
 
Outside of Chesney I am not sure there is a mutual fit. Maybe Candle. Maybe Monken. Everyone else either doesn't fit SU or we do not fit with the coach.
 
He just does not seem like a Syracuse target.
Absolutely not. No more first time coaches. No more small school guys. Syracuse Needs to put all its chips in a basket and find a name.
 
Cignetti Cignetti Cignetti

My top 3
Northeast roots. Recruiting chops in talent rich Va. He could bring half his team with him and we’d be top 3 in ACC. Those kids can thrive in ACC. JMU already best program in the state. Unlike the Liberty guy, Cig is affordable.
 
Outside of Chesney I am not sure there is a mutual fit. Maybe Candle. Maybe Monken. Everyone else either doesn't fit SU or we do not fit with the coach.

Syracuse is a unique problem for any HC candidate. There's no perfect plug and play guy absent MAYBE Doug Marrone. I wouldn't even want Sean Lewis because that's the Dino tree. Need to cut that tree down at this point.

Chesney has won everywhere he's gone and has done a D3 to D1AA leap from Salve to Assumption to Holy Cross. Impressive. The hardest jump is the HC to Syracuse one because of the league. Be great if he could bring Matt Sluka along with him. Guy is a top qb who is better than Shrader
 
I would be a hard no on Marrone for the simple reason he is part of the past. Syracuse has to look forward. I really don't care at all about the coach having NE connections either, he can hire staff with those connections. Give me a HC with winning experience/track record and brings some discipline. I am also good with Syracuse punching above their salary weight, even if they risk it failing and being on the hook limiting options after. Sometimes you just need to swing for a homerun.
 
I think the issue SU has is the “you can’t win at Syracuse” narrative. True or not, a lot of people believe what they hear, coaches too. So, the result is that coaches stay away because they think it’s the place their career goes to die.

The counter to that is money. Pay someone enough and they will come. The issue with that is you get a coach that “just wants to get paid, but winning might not truly be first on the agenda.

Tough spot.
 

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