"Cramping" question...

690West

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#2
How come it seems to only happen to defensive players on the opposing team? Their offensive players seems to have far fewer "injuries" and cramps...just sayin'. Since it is so obvious, why doesn't the league do something about it?
Next year if you’re hurt you have to sit out until the next series. It’s coming.
 

OrangeDW

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#3
Agreed. Though I think it’s safe to say their star defensive player wasn’t faking. He actually came out of the game, and still looked to be struggling with his leg when he was back in later on.
 

bigmike

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#4
Dinoitis, as a general rule, tends only to afflict defensive players. It is particularly common among defensive lineman who tend not to have the cardio capacity required to keep up with an accelerated pace of play.
-Harvard Journal of Medicine
 
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#5
Agreed. Though I think it’s safe to say their star defensive player wasn’t faking. He actually came out of the game, and still looked to be struggling with his leg when he was back in later on.
I made the comment during the game that when Burns went down with a cramp, it looked like how a player with a cramp should look. On the ground immediately, obvious pain. Not the look over to the sideline, grab your leg and slowly fall to the ground.
 

blizz

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#6
It's so obvious. The result is a chance to play 4 minutes of commercials...not going away any time soon.

But I don't see it becoming a problem until the Alabama's and Ohio State's of the world start featuring tempo offenses. And I don't see that happening. Best bet right now ironically is FSU and the way things are looking Taggart might not make it out of this year with a job.

The best we get is to say to other teams 'if you're better than line up and stop us.'
 

blizz

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#8
I made the comment during the game that when Burns went down with a cramp, it looked like how a player with a cramp should look. On the ground immediately, obvious pain. Not the look over to the sideline, grab your leg and slowly fall to the ground.
Dude was legit hurt.

I will say, fake or not, I really don't like the booing. Bad look.
 
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#9
How come it seems to only happen to defensive players on the opposing team? Their offensive players seems to have far fewer "injuries" and cramps...just sayin'. Since it is so obvious, why doesn't the league do something about it?
It has to be chalked up to the fast pace of our offense. Our players are conditioned for it, theirs are not.
 

690West

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#10
Dude was legit hurt.

I will say, fake or not, I really don't like the booing. Bad look.
The reason the booing is acceptable is that it’s bringing vocal attention to the cheating. Announcers are mentioning the booing. Twitter talks about it. The booing is going to change the rule to stop the cheating. Then we can go back to fake clapping when an opponent gets hurt to make us feel better.
 
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#14
The reason the booing is acceptable is that it’s bringing vocal attention to the cheating. Announcers are mentioning the booing. Twitter talks about it. The booing is going to change the rule to stop the cheating. Then we can go back to fake clapping when an opponent gets hurt to make us feel better.
:rolling:Hilarious! And probably true.
 
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#15
It is absolutely unacceptable to boo opposing players who are hurt. I don't buy for a minute that teams are faking injuries to slow down the tempo. Visiting teams have suffered from cramps in early season games in the dome since year one. It has nothing to do with cheating. I was sitting behind the SU bench when we played at Clemson a few years ago and I thought it was outrageous for their fans to boo SU players who got hurt. I could see the players when they came off the field and they were truly in pain. It's too bad that many SU fans have the same lack of class.
 

OrangeinBoston

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#16
Nobody booed when FSU's OL went down in the second half because he was clearly injured.

The issue of DEFENSIVE players going down to stop play when faced with teams that play "Fast" has been talked about all over the college football map, not just the Dome. If you are not aware of this, you haven't been watching college football. As someone pointed out, I would expect a rule change forcing players to sit out a play, or a number of plays, if they pull this stuff.
 
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#17
Nobody booed when FSU's OL went down in the second half because he was clearly injured.

The issue of DEFENSIVE players going down to stop play when faced with teams that play "Fast" has been talked about all over the college football map, not just the Dome. If you are not aware of this, you haven't been watching college football. As someone pointed out, I would expect a rule change forcing players to sit out a play, or a number of plays, if they pull this stuff.
I understand. At the 2014 SU-Clemson game, the Clemson fans thought SU defensive players were faking injuries to slow down Clemson's tempo. They were wrong. The FSU players yesterday were going down due to cramps. They were not cheating. It is classless to boo them. Classless.
 

OrangeDW

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#18
I understand. At the 2014 SU-Clemson game, the Clemson fans thought SU defensive players were faking injuries to slow down Clemson's tempo. They were wrong. The FSU players yesterday were going down due to cramps. They were not cheating. It is classless to boo them. Classless.
The cramping issue at the Dome is very real. I remember many southern teams having players dropping, way before we ran a hurry up offense.

However, faking injuries to slow down uptempo offenses is also a real thing.

I agree with those who say players should be required to come out of the game, if the game is stopped due to their injury. That protects the players a bit more if they actually were injured and creates a penalty for faking.
 
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#19
It is absolutely unacceptable to boo opposing players who are hurt. I don't buy for a minute that teams are faking injuries to slow down the tempo. Visiting teams have suffered from cramps in early season games in the dome since year one. It has nothing to do with cheating. I was sitting behind the SU bench when we played at Clemson a few years ago and I thought it was outrageous for their fans to boo SU players who got hurt. I could see the players when they came off the field and they were truly in pain. It's too bad that many SU fans have the same lack of class.
Apparently you have no clue about how FSU goes down faking - yes faking - cramps when playing vs SU.. Last year at FSU they had a player look towards the bench then slowly its down when SU was making a drive against them. He got to the sideline and never even had "treatment". He came running back into the game the very next play. So yes they had been definitely coached to go down to slow the play when SU was getting momentum. Laughabley last week when FSU was going hurry up their fans booed instantly when the other team did the same thing to them. To think teams do not do this is ridiculous. Now some/many cramps are real but do not put your blinders on to reality either.
 

DPCuse

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#20
I know Burns was actually hurt, that’s why I said the way he acted on the ground is how an actual injured player looks.
Burns, if he is #99, was not hurt. It happened right in front of me. He limped off like his knee was shot, sat on the table for maybe one play, took a sip of water and hopped right up and started doing high knees on the sideline. He was back out there right after running full speed. That doesn't happen with a cramp or a real injury. I think he's just a good actor.
 

JoeSU

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#21
The field temperature was 97° for yesterday's Jaguars-Patriots game, and I don't recall a single player going down with "leg cramps".

I hope 690West is right about a fix being in the works (sitting out the next series seems like a reasonable response).
 
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#22
If it truely is a cramp why does it need to be attended to on the field for 5 minutes? Get the medical crew get him off and treated and we can move on in the game.
 

bigmike

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#23
A couple of other minor points:
  1. The only known and immediate cure for Dinoitis is a turnover at the end of a play where the symptoms first begin to manifest.
  2. A related malady known at the Petrino Syndrome (PS) is an extraordinary acceleration of the number of cases of Dinoitis within an individual game.
  3. The CDC is preparing for an outbreak of PS on Nov. 9th.
This has been a public service announcement.
 

xc84

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#25
The cramping issue at the Dome is very real. I remember many southern teams having players dropping, way before we ran a hurry up offense.

However, faking injuries to slow down uptempo offenses is also a real thing.

I agree with those who say players should be required to come out of the game, if the game is stopped due to their injury. That protects the players a bit more if they actually were injured and creates a penalty for faking.
I remember in the past southern teams handling the heat of the dome way better than SU players. Which makes a lot of sense when you think about it.
 


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