One and Done going away? | Page 3 | Syracusefan.com

One and Done going away?

RandygoCuse

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Why are you ok with it in football but not in basketball?
This thread is about basketball. I'd be for it in football as well. I do think it helps that the NBA has a developmental league that teams can send players to if it turns out they're not ready.
 

RandygoCuse

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As I said in another post, the European leagues are over that way. ------->
I don't think a kid should have to travel halfway around the world when there are people willing to pay him in the US - and it's generally better money too.
 

73CAV

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A couple of thoughts:
There will always be OADs. There will always be a set of players who believe, if they cannot get drafted directly out of high school, denied either by fiat or evaluation, then all that they do need is one year of college competition. OADs are here to stay. There will also always be undrafted OADs.
Most scholarship agreements are for just a single year. The school is not obligated to finance a four year degree. The terms of the boilerplate NLI favor the schools, too. It is binding on the athlete but not the school. (Why any elite recruit signs one is beyond me.)
If viewer demand for the games of programs such as Overtime Elite and G League Ignite grows enough, this will all become moot. They will then generate enough revenue to pay serious salaries, and there will always be those prospects who are totally uninterested in attending classes. Additionally, if that viewer demand grows, it will also mean that media exposure has increased, making those programs even more appealing.
Lastly, it is also worth remembering that the NBA draft only has two rounds (60 picks, most years). There is also an inherent risk associated with drafting a player directly out of high school. It seems a bit unlikely that ten to 20 prep players would be picked in any given year. Five to ten seems a bit more likely.
 
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dan7800

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If everyone really wanted to empower young people, why not require a BA/BS degree to play in the NBA? I can't think of anything more beneficial than an education.
 

Capt. Tuttle

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My point is that nobody is forcing anyone to sign a contract, you don’t like the offer then don’t sign.Maybe some people think two free years of school plus a stipend is of some value and maybe some don’t.
It's not free. You are working for it.
 

Capt. Tuttle

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If everyone really wanted to empower young people, why not require a BA/BS degree to play in the NBA? I can't think of anything more beneficial than an education.
What about money. That might be more beneficial for a family. Why not bonus people who have a degree.
Also, I think sports leagues should have a rule that if you are a felon, you can't play.
 

dan7800

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What about money. That might be more beneficial for a family. Why not bonus people who have a degree.
Also, I think sports leagues should have a rule that if you are a felon, you can't play.
The money could definitely be helpful. I don't disagree with the felon route. However, I'd also contend that very few 1 and done players actually "make" it in the NBA, and even a few hundred K isn't life changing long term. A degree that could provide some value is. Also, I'm too lazy to look this up, but I surmise that a majority of NFL and NBA players who play in the league for a few years are basically broke 10 years out of the league.
 

Capt. Tuttle

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The money could definitely be helpful. I don't disagree with the felon route. However, I'd also contend that very few 1 and done players actually "make" it in the NBA, and even a few hundred K isn't life changing long term. A degree that could provide some value is. Also, I'm too lazy to look this up, but I surmise that a majority of NFL and NBA players who play in the league for a few years are basically broke 10 years out of the league.
So what. Most people don't need a college degree to do the work they wind up doing. They certainly don't need to go for 4 years. Even if you want to be a doctor, why can't you just take sciences, then go straight to Med school. It's a terrible system that we have set up.
 

pfister1

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What would be wrong with schools making kids sign a contract that makes them stay at least two years? Nobody is forcing anyone to sign that type of agreement, if you enlist in the military you don’t just get up and leave after one year.

Have things changed such that schools are now legally committed to more than one year of scholarship at a time for the players?
 

pfister1

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The big delineator in the past was hiring an agent. If you didn't hire one you could withdraw your name from the NBA draft and come back to school. I've never heard of a process of entering your name into the baseball draft: AFIK they just pick you as their choice. The people like Danny Kanell, who played minor league baseball and went to college for football, didn't have an agent and negotiated for themselves. IDK if that has changed with the advent of NIL.

I don’t think baseball does the pre-draft deep dive on players that basketball does. NBA teams expect their drafted players to make the roster. MLB teams hope their drafted players will sign, play their way through the minor league system and maybe eventually make it to the show.
 

CuseFaninVT

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So what. Most people don't need a college degree to do the work they wind up doing. They certainly don't need to go for 4 years. Even if you want to be a doctor, why can't you just take sciences, then go straight to Med school. It's a terrible system that we have set up.
You’re a terrible system
 

OttoinGrotto

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If everyone really wanted to empower young people, why not require a BA/BS degree to play in the NBA? I can't think of anything more beneficial than an education.
Well, first off, it's already been proven that a degree isn't a requirement for being a successful player in the NBA. I don't believe a single All-NBA player this past season entered the NBA with a degree.

Second, you're talking about shaving years off of a player's career. That's punitive.

Third, that creates a mess with international players.

Your solution creates more problems than it solves.
 

Capt. Tuttle

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You’re a terrible system
Kids are in debt in 6 figures for jobs that pay $40k a year. The notion that everyone needs college is stupid. You can learn so much on Youtube now that it can replace college. My kids have learned about Foreign Exchange Trading, Options, etc., and are now doing some light trading to get experience before they invest more. No college needed.

Now we have a President burdening taxpayers for the loans that people had to take out to pay for degrees that don't pay back enough money.

For a large number of college grads, the ROI is negative.

Because of the availability of student loans, the cost of college has skyrocketed, far above inflation. ( The same result with medical care and insurance, btw.)
Anecdotally, this weekend we met a young lady who is paying $80k a year to get a performance and music education degree. Crazy.
 

orangecuse

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Kids are in debt in 6 figures for jobs that pay $40k a year. The notion that everyone needs college is stupid. You can learn so much on Youtube now that it can replace college. My kids have learned about Foreign Exchange Trading, Options, etc., and are now doing some light trading to get experience before they invest more. No college needed.

Now we have a President burdening taxpayers for the loans that people had to take out to pay for degrees that don't pay back enough money.

For a large number of college grads, the ROI is negative.

Because of the availability of student loans, the cost of college has skyrocketed, far above inflation. ( The same result with medical care and insurance, btw.)
Anecdotally, this weekend we met a young lady who is paying $80k a year to get a performance and music education degree. Crazy.

There's quite a bit of truth in your post(s) IMO. Other than a select few professions, the vast majority of folks learn their skills on the job, etc.. A BA in Business Administration, and many other alike type degrees, etc. had absolutely none, to very little bearing whatsoever relative to one's career and successes, but rather what was learned on the job, gathering pertinent skills and experiences, along with one's particular work ethic.

These rather garden-variety type undergrad college degrees that most seemingly get, for the most part, are generally privileged pre-requisite requirements in order to get one's foot in the door today.
 

SBU72

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The big delineator in the past was hiring an agent. If you didn't hire one you could withdraw your name from the NBA draft and come back to school. I've never heard of a process of entering your name into the baseball draft: AFIK they just pick you as their choice. The people like Danny Kanell, who played minor league baseball and went to college for football, didn't have an agent and negotiated for themselves. IDK if that has changed with the advent of NIL.
With NIL, why should hiring an agent matter any more? Why if a hs grade fails to get drafted or get a D-league contract not be able to go to college to improve his craft?
 

Hoo's That

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With NIL, why should hiring an agent matter any more? Why if a hs grade fails to get drafted or get a D-league contract not be able to go to college to improve his craft?
Like I tried to say, I don't know how NIL has affected the old "hiring an agent" restriction.

Plus, I don't give a rat's patootie whether he gets to "improve his craft" in college. One of the lessons we all have to learn in life is living with the decisions we make. He made a decision. It turned out to be wrong for one or more reasons. Now he can learn to live with that decision, along with learning about a foreign culture and improving his craft, by playing outside the US. He couldn't care less about an education, he just cares about playing basketball. Well, now he'll get an opportunity to just play basketball.

Oh, and I don't think college basketball was any poorer by not having Kobe Bryant, Kevin Garnett, LeBron James, et al., play for a year before they turned pro. They would have done that under the old "hardship draft" since there was no "one and done" at the time.
 

SBU72

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Like I tried to say, I don't know how NIL has affected the old "hiring an agent" restriction.

Plus, I don't give a rat's patootie whether he gets to "improve his craft" in college. One of the lessons we all have to learn in life is living with the decisions we make. He made a decision. It turned out to be wrong for one or more reasons. Now he can learn to live with that decision, along with learning about a foreign culture and improving his craft, by playing outside the US. He couldn't care less about an education, he just cares about playing basketball. Well, now he'll get an opportunity to just play basketball.

Oh, and I don't think college basketball was any poorer by not having Kobe Bryant, Kevin Garnett, LeBron James, et al., play for a year before they turned pro. They would have done that under the old "hardship draft" since there was no "one and done" at the time.
So a person trys to take their band on the road to make it big then decides to go to college and study music and gets a scholarship to do so. A kid becomes a apprentice carpenter the gets a scholarship to be an architect. There are plenty of examples of kids making life decisions coming out of hs only to change their minds for what ever reason and get a scholarship to hone their craft in college. Changing their minds shouldn't be held against them because of some antiquated rule made by old men p'od that they weren't the kids first choice.

The NCAA has or had plenty of rules designed to control college athletics not for the betterment of college sports but for the benefit of the NCAA. Here's an example of such an antiquated rule. Once upon a time track athletes could be banned from competing in NCAA events if they ran in an AAU event. No other reason but not wantingbthe too.. We have discussed plenty of examples of the NCAA looking the other way when select schools violaterulesbut come down hard for minor infractions on others.
 

Hoo's That

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So a person trys to take their band on the road to make it big then decides to go to college and study music and gets a scholarship to do so. A kid becomes a apprentice carpenter the gets a scholarship to be an architect. There are plenty of examples of kids making life decisions coming out of hs only to change their minds for what ever reason and get a scholarship to hone their craft in college. Changing their minds shouldn't be held against them because of some antiquated rule made by old men p'od that they weren't the kids first choice.

The NCAA has or had plenty of rules designed to control college athletics not for the betterment of college sports but for the benefit of the NCAA. Here's an example of such an antiquated rule. Once upon a time track athletes could be banned from competing in NCAA events if they ran in an AAU event. No other reason but not wantingbthe too.. We have discussed plenty of examples of the NCAA looking the other way when select schools violaterulesbut come down hard for minor infractions on others.
The changing of minds regarding those professions has nothing to do with athletics (the domain of the NCAA) or any sort of competitive balance involving those universities. The relationship between college and pro sports is bad enough as it is. We don't need their castoffs suddenly deciding to play in school. I am an NBA and NFL hater, so anything adverse happening with them is perfectly fine by me. When any player leaves college for whatever reason, they fall off the face of the Earth in my worldview.

The ban of track athletes was fallout from the war between the AAU and the NCAA over control of amateur athletics. Now that professionals can be in the Olympics, that war's over.
 

FRANKIEFAN

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Let players get drafted and play NCAA ball. They do this in hockey.
 

Fat tire 13

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I wonder how many college basketball players could earn more through NIL than playing professionally? If you aren't a guaranteed NBA first round pick, but could earn $1 million being a starter at a fun college, it changes the criteria drastically

Like for example, how much are all those UNC guys (Bacot, Love, etc) going to make next year?
 

longtimefan

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So what. Most people don't need a college degree to do the work they wind up doing. They certainly don't need to go for 4 years. Even if you want to be a doctor, why can't you just take sciences, then go straight to Med school. It's a terrible system that we have set up.
That would certainly work if you want to work in a lab or do other research. But if you want to, you know, treat patients, some education beyond the hard sciences would be a good idea.
 

pfister1

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So a person trys to take their band on the road to make it big then decides to go to college and study music and gets a scholarship to do so. A kid becomes a apprentice carpenter the gets a scholarship to be an architect. There are plenty of examples of kids making life decisions coming out of hs only to change their minds for what ever reason and get a scholarship to hone their craft in college. Changing their minds shouldn't be held against them because of some antiquated rule made by old men p'od that they weren't the kids first choice.

The NCAA has or had plenty of rules designed to control college athletics not for the betterment of college sports but for the benefit of the NCAA. Here's an example of such an antiquated rule. Once upon a time track athletes could be banned from competing in NCAA events if they ran in an AAU event. No other reason but not wantingbthe too.. We have discussed plenty of examples of the NCAA looking the other way when select schools violaterulesbut come down hard for minor infractions on others.

And why isn’t it the fault of the NBA for setting up their system the way they have? The NCAA predates the NBA. Baseball works well. You don’t have to “enter” your name in the draft. You can be selected after your senior year in high school, after your junior or senior year at a four year college or after you’ve completed two years at a JUCO. The teams take the risk that they’ll draft you and then not be able to adequately invent you to sign.

It doesn’t work that way in basketball because pro basketball has decided to put much more of the risk on the kids.
 

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