Reading the Oronde Tea Leaves… | Page 10 | Syracusefan.com

Reading the Oronde Tea Leaves…

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I can most definitely confirm that the OL has been wearing knee braces for years for prophylactic measures. Same with having the walking boot and other DME bracing on hand. I know for a fact they aren’t skimping in any way what so ever and have a state of the art training room (Minus the waterfalls) and staff.

The only thing we can do is continue to build depth to better absorb these injuries. It certainly has nothing to do with what we’re doing other than bad luck.
This post is way too rational for this forum full of torch and pitchfork people
 
He can make a majority of the throws in college but that doesn’t mean he can make them in the NFL. Particularly the way he floats his out route is a pick 6 waiting to happen in the league. If your only quality at QB is scrambling teams are going to stack the box, play press man, and make you throw into tight windows. I don’t believe he has NFL arm talent, I think he’s a really good college QB.
So it’s not just me that holds their breath when GS throws screens and out routes?
1… 2… 3…
 
So it’s not just me that holds their breath when GS throws screens and out routes?
1… 2… 3…
Dungey was like that too. Just floating balls out to the flat.

Remember that weird shovel pass we used to run with Dungey too? Strangely effective play but looked like it was going to be a turnover every time.
 
I believe that’s considered insensitive to pirates. Just food for thought
So, here's the thing...

With rising healthcare costs and a healthcare industry laden with profit incentives at all layers (see Why is health care so expensive in the United States? for reference), hospital systems face intense pressures to operate in as cost-efficient manner as possible, often putting their operations at odds with the objective to provide the best care possible to patients (note this report from the Peterson Foundation How Does the US Healthcare System Compare to Other Countries?). People resources, particularly highly skilled and credentialed ones like health professionals, are a considerable expense to hospital systems, so hospitals find themselves in a difficult cycle attempting to staff sufficiently to maintain an adequate service level that doesn't deter people from using their services (we'll leave the effects of insurance out of the discussion for now, although that's a significant part of it), while not paying wages to doctors and other health professionals on the clock without any immediate use of their skills.

I mention all of that for this very key reason - when OG was taken to the hospital, it unfortunately occurred during a "low traffic" time that the hospital has generally found for the sake of cost efficiency can operate with not just fewer staff members, but ones that are not necessarily of their highest caliber. As fate would have it, that meant the doctor that observed and assessed OG's condition and treatment was a pirate doctor.

You can see where this is going. While masterful at providing patients with creative remedies for maritime afflictions like scurvy and sea sickness, pirate doctors have a well-known history for certain preferences, and some may even say biases, toward certain treatments that are undeniably effective, but are perhaps less elegant than others.

Like a carpenter with a hammer to which everything appears a nail, to a pirate doctor with an observation of lower body injury, the inevitable treatment is peg leg.
 
Sounds like he will be out either the majority of the season or the entire season.

That now makes it 3 out of our last 5 high profile NFL prospects to get hurt in their assumed final season for Syracuse. Cisco, Garrett Williams, and OG. The final 2 of the 5 would be Tucker and Bergeron. You can even make the case that Tucker wasn’t healthy last year as we all saw him hobbled plenty last season.

Bergeron is the only guy to make it through a season unscathed. This stuff has to change. Not sure if it’s just atrocious luck, or something to do with S/C staff.

Regardless it’s devastating to the players’ draft stock and the teams season.
Back around the GRob era, we lost our best player to injury about 7 out of 8 years, and that other year IIRC we lost him to a non-injury issue.
 
We even hired a nutritionist, so there goes another favorite board excuse
But did they hire a good one? Just because you hired one doesn't mean they are competent ie Will Hicks.
 
Shouldn't the law of averages apply here though with all these injuries?
 
So, here's the thing...

With rising healthcare costs and a healthcare industry laden with profit incentives at all layers (see Why is health care so expensive in the United States? for reference), hospital systems face intense pressures to operate in as cost-efficient manner as possible, often putting their operations at odds with the objective to provide the best care possible to patients (note this report from the Peterson Foundation How Does the US Healthcare System Compare to Other Countries?). People resources, particularly highly skilled and credentialed ones like health professionals, are a considerable expense to hospital systems, so hospitals find themselves in a difficult cycle attempting to staff sufficiently to maintain an adequate service level that doesn't deter people from using their services (we'll leave the effects of insurance out of the discussion for now, although that's a significant part of it), while not paying wages to doctors and other health professionals on the clock without any immediate use of their skills.

I mention all of that for this very key reason - when OG was taken to the hospital, it unfortunately occurred during a "low traffic" time that the hospital has generally found for the sake of cost efficiency can operate with not just fewer staff members, but ones that are not necessarily of their highest caliber. As fate would have it, that meant the doctor that observed and assessed OG's condition and treatment was a pirate doctor.

You can see where this is going. While masterful at providing patients with creative remedies for maritime afflictions like scurvy and sea sickness, pirate doctors have a well-known history for certain preferences, and some may even say biases, toward certain treatments that are undeniably effective, but are perhaps less elegant than others.

Like a carpenter with a hammer to which everything appears a nail, to a pirate doctor with an observation of lower body injury, the inevitable treatment is peg leg.
This will work out well for him on Tuesday. Whether he makes the next leg in his metamorphosis is up to him.

 
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