• Reminder: We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.

    There’s a link in the top navigation bar for Amazon.com. Purchases made via this link help support Syracusefan.com.

What is happening with Melo?

OrangeDW

Living Legend
Joined
Aug 8, 2012
Messages
17,497
Likes
36,329
#51
Melo is NBA old and never has been a Lebron, Tom Brady freak about taking care of his body. At this point if he wants to succeed he needs to be in late career Ray Allen, JJ Reddick type role as just a shooter.
He’s never been that level of a shooter though.

I said this in another post, but in the 90s-00’s NBA, he’d still be a big time scorer on someone’s second unit.

It’s the current style of play where everyone just runs around real fast and jacks quick 3’s or gets to the hole that he doesn’t fit into.

Melo needs to catch the ball at 17 feet and jab step himself into some space to bang off the dribble jumpers. Apparently that’s a crime in today’s NBA.

As Popovich just said:
“These days there’s such an emphasis on the three because it’s proven to be analytically correct,” Popovich Monday offered with what appeared to be a sneer. “Now you look at a stat sheet after a game and the first thing you look at is the threes. If you made threes and the other team didn’t, you win. You don’t even look at the rebounds or the turnovers or how much transition D was involved. You don’t even care. That’s how much an impact the three-point shot has and it’s evidenced by how everybody plays.”

“I hate it, but I always have,” Popovich said even as he’s adjusted over the years. “I’ve hated the three for 20 years. That’s why I make a joke all the time (and say) if we’re going to make it a different game, let’s have a four-point play. Because if everybody likes the three, they’ll really like the four. People will jump out of their seats if you have a five-point play. It will be great. There’s no basketball anymore, there’s no beauty in it. It’s pretty boring. But it is what it is and you need to work with it.”
 

jncuse

Hall of Fame
Joined
Feb 19, 2012
Messages
9,746
Likes
12,251
#53
He’s never been that level of a shooter though.

I said this in another post, but in the 90s-00’s NBA, he’d still be a big time scorer on someone’s second unit.

It’s the current style of play where everyone just runs around real fast and jacks quick 3’s or gets to the hole that he doesn’t fit into.

Melo needs to catch the ball at 17 feet and jab step himself into some space to bang off the dribble jumpers. Apparently that’s a crime in today’s NBA.

As Popovich just said:
“These days there’s such an emphasis on the three because it’s proven to be analytically correct,” Popovich Monday offered with what appeared to be a sneer. “Now you look at a stat sheet after a game and the first thing you look at is the threes. If you made threes and the other team didn’t, you win. You don’t even look at the rebounds or the turnovers or how much transition D was involved. You don’t even care. That’s how much an impact the three-point shot has and it’s evidenced by how everybody plays.”

“I hate it, but I always have,” Popovich said even as he’s adjusted over the years. “I’ve hated the three for 20 years. That’s why I make a joke all the time (and say) if we’re going to make it a different game, let’s have a four-point play. Because if everybody likes the three, they’ll really like the four. People will jump out of their seats if you have a five-point play. It will be great. There’s no basketball anymore, there’s no beauty in it. It’s pretty boring. But it is what it is and you need to work with it.”

Pop hated the 3 but he has embraced it quite a bit because he knows it is an element to winning . He has never embraced the type of bolded basketball.

Today is not only about transition and shooting 3s. There are still a fair number 2's... With the extra space that comes from shooting many 3's, it allows more efficient 2 point shots if you move the ball quickly or break down the D.

He is just not a good defender, and his game does not make offences more efficient (anymore)... it certainly did for a long time.
 
Last edited:

realorange

All American
Joined
Aug 26, 2011
Messages
5,697
Likes
7,226
#54
Melo needs to look at Kobi's last year and decide not to go that route.

I doubt he needs the money and he doesn't need anymore negative PR to think about.

Time to cash it in Melo.
 

orangenauburn

Hall of Fame
Joined
Aug 20, 2011
Messages
7,930
Likes
7,511
#55
Didnt know one players bad D was to blame for 115 points a game? Especially when said one player can contribute 20 - 40 points on O on any night
 

OrangeDW

Living Legend
Joined
Aug 8, 2012
Messages
17,497
Likes
36,329
#56
Melo needs to look at Kobi's last year and decide not to go that route.

I doubt he needs the money and he doesn't need anymore negative PR to think about.

Time to cash it in Melo.
Thing is, most wont remember Kobe’s last year...just his last game which the last few minutes were one of the greatest things I’ve ever watched.

 

perdurabo

Scout Team
Joined
Nov 15, 2013
Messages
253
Likes
312
#57
The list of five players Pierce calls the toughest ever to defend includes LeBron James ("His style of play just wears you out over the course of a game."); Vince Carter("He's hell to guard out on the perimeter because of the elevation on his shot. But you were so afraid of him blowing by you and throwing down a dunk that would be all over SportsCenter that you would allow him space to shoot."); Tracy McGrady ("He's 6'9", has long arms and can jump out of the gym, so every time he went up to shoot there was no point even trying to block it."); and Kobe Bryant("By taking that many shots, he's meticulously wearing down the defender until he breaks them. He's made a career out of making guys lose confidence in their defense and then continuing to attack them.")

But Pierce says the one player who has been more difficult to guard than any of the others has been Carmelo Anthony.

Pierce's biggest complaint about guarding 'Melo is that there are no holes in his game. He notes that Kobe can be defended down low and LeBron can sometimes be stopped by making him take jumpshots.

The same can't be said about guarding Anthony.

If I had to single one guy out who is the most difficult player to guard in the league, it would have to be Carmelo. He’s a unique blend of being big, strong, and athletic while also having a world-class shooting touch and a natural ability to get to the rim. That’s what sets him apart — every facet of his game is elite.

Some great players will have one or two particular skills that make them special. But Carmelo can do everything, which puts you in a baaad situation as a defender. A lot of guys might shoot better from certain areas, so you try to force them elsewhere on the floor. Carmelo doesn’t have a spot on the floor where he can’t consistently hit shots.

In my opinion, his combination of physicality and shooting touch is unmatched in the NBA. You can’t take one second off when you’re matched up against him.

The Five Toughest Players I've Ever Guarded | By Paul Pierce
 

Arangeman

2nd String
Joined
Mar 18, 2017
Messages
551
Likes
1,079
#59
Thing is, most wont remember Kobe’s last year...just his last game which the last few minutes were one of the greatest things I’ve ever watched.

Wow. Didn’t realize Lakers were down 10 in that with 3 to go.

Something lost in the Toronto 81 point game, Lakers were down 18 with 8:41 in the 3rd. Neither game was a gimmick. Assasin.
 

realorange

All American
Joined
Aug 26, 2011
Messages
5,697
Likes
7,226
#60
The list of five players Pierce calls the toughest ever to defend includes LeBron James ("His style of play just wears you out over the course of a game."); Vince Carter("He's hell to guard out on the perimeter because of the elevation on his shot. But you were so afraid of him blowing by you and throwing down a dunk that would be all over SportsCenter that you would allow him space to shoot."); Tracy McGrady ("He's 6'9", has long arms and can jump out of the gym, so every time he went up to shoot there was no point even trying to block it."); and Kobe Bryant("By taking that many shots, he's meticulously wearing down the defender until he breaks them. He's made a career out of making guys lose confidence in their defense and then continuing to attack them.")

But Pierce says the one player who has been more difficult to guard than any of the others has been Carmelo Anthony.

Pierce's biggest complaint about guarding 'Melo is that there are no holes in his game. He notes that Kobe can be defended down low and LeBron can sometimes be stopped by making him take jumpshots.

The same can't be said about guarding Anthony.

If I had to single one guy out who is the most difficult player to guard in the league, it would have to be Carmelo. He’s a unique blend of being big, strong, and athletic while also having a world-class shooting touch and a natural ability to get to the rim. That’s what sets him apart — every facet of his game is elite.

Some great players will have one or two particular skills that make them special. But Carmelo can do everything, which puts you in a baaad situation as a defender. A lot of guys might shoot better from certain areas, so you try to force them elsewhere on the floor. Carmelo doesn’t have a spot on the floor where he can’t consistently hit shots.

In my opinion, his combination of physicality and shooting touch is unmatched in the NBA. You can’t take one second off when you’re matched up against him.

The Five Toughest Players I've Ever Guarded | By Paul Pierce
But as the old quote goes "That was then and this is now"
 

SmilinBob

Hall of Fame
Joined
Aug 30, 2011
Messages
9,012
Likes
5,815
#61
He’s never been that level of a shooter though.

I said this in another post, but in the 90s-00’s NBA, he’d still be a big time scorer on someone’s second unit.

It’s the current style of play where everyone just runs around real fast and jacks quick 3’s or gets to the hole that he doesn’t fit into.

Melo needs to catch the ball at 17 feet and jab step himself into some space to bang off the dribble jumpers. Apparently that’s a crime in today’s NBA.

As Popovich just said:
“These days there’s such an emphasis on the three because it’s proven to be analytically correct,” Popovich Monday offered with what appeared to be a sneer. “Now you look at a stat sheet after a game and the first thing you look at is the threes. If you made threes and the other team didn’t, you win. You don’t even look at the rebounds or the turnovers or how much transition D was involved. You don’t even care. That’s how much an impact the three-point shot has and it’s evidenced by how everybody plays.”

“I hate it, but I always have,” Popovich said even as he’s adjusted over the years. “I’ve hated the three for 20 years. That’s why I make a joke all the time (and say) if we’re going to make it a different game, let’s have a four-point play. Because if everybody likes the three, they’ll really like the four. People will jump out of their seats if you have a five-point play. It will be great. There’s no basketball anymore, there’s no beauty in it. It’s pretty boring. But it is what it is and you need to work with it.”
I could see how Popovich and Boeheim could be close friends.
 

OrangeDW

Living Legend
Joined
Aug 8, 2012
Messages
17,497
Likes
36,329
#63
Amazing. How about that moving screen at 2:34 though? haha.
The refs certainly swallowed their whistles on the Lakers on both ends of the floor a few times at the end of that game, which assisted the comeback a bit. No question.

But Kobe suddenly hitting every shot he took was pretty magical.
 
Joined
Aug 26, 2011
Messages
1,635
Likes
1,102
#64
For what it's worth, Chris Paul is 6th in NBA history in career Player Efficiency Rating, and Iguodala isn't anywhere in the Top 250.

View attachment 145915
This list is an amazing who’s who except for Neil Johnston. Who the heck is that?

Edit:
Donald Neil Johnston was an American basketball player at the center position who played eight years in the National Basketball Association, from 1951 to 1959. He was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame as a player in 1990.Wikipedia
 

Eric15

Living Legend
Joined
Aug 28, 2011
Messages
14,812
Likes
34,952
#65
This list is an amazing who’s who except for Neil Johnston. Who the heck is that?
Played in the very early years of the NBA for the Philadelphia Warriors. 3x scoring champion, 4x first team. Surprised he isn't more of a household name. Died very young at 49.
 

BillJay

Scout Team
Joined
Aug 17, 2011
Messages
315
Likes
421
#67
ESPN piece on Melo, complete with colorful shot charts. Despite the title, it's not a hit piece; basic message is that he's a player for another time. The other time, BTW, isn't that long ago. An observation the article makes is that "In the 10 years before the 2004 rule changes (hand checking, defensive 3 seconds, etc.), the NBA handed out its MVP trophy to bigs seven times. In the 14 years since, it has happened only once. "
Melo is the last great american ball hog
 
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
32
Likes
54
#68
ESPN piece on Melo, complete with colorful shot charts. Despite the title, it's not a hit piece; basic message is that he's a player for another time. The other time, BTW, isn't that long ago. An observation the article makes is that "In the 10 years before the 2004 rule changes (hand checking, defensive 3 seconds, etc.), the NBA handed out its MVP trophy to bigs seven times. In the 14 years since, it has happened only once. "
Melo is the last great american ball hog
This was an interesting piece - pretty accurate.
 

OrangeDW

Living Legend
Joined
Aug 8, 2012
Messages
17,497
Likes
36,329
#69
ESPN piece on Melo, complete with colorful shot charts. Despite the title, it's not a hit piece; basic message is that he's a player for another time. The other time, BTW, isn't that long ago. An observation the article makes is that "In the 10 years before the 2004 rule changes (hand checking, defensive 3 seconds, etc.), the NBA handed out its MVP trophy to bigs seven times. In the 14 years since, it has happened only once. "
Melo is the last great american ball hog
I literally posted that Pop quote and made that same point about Melo fitting into the “old” NBA on here multiple times.

I don’t want any royalties, ESPN. You’re free to jack my posts. Just stop sucking so much, though.
 

Sherman20

2018 Iggy Leading Scorer Winner
Joined
Apr 25, 2017
Messages
1,069
Likes
2,002
#70
He’s never been that level of a shooter though.

I said this in another post, but in the 90s-00’s NBA, he’d still be a big time scorer on someone’s second unit.

It’s the current style of play where everyone just runs around real fast and jacks quick 3’s or gets to the hole that he doesn’t fit into.

Melo needs to catch the ball at 17 feet and jab step himself into some space to bang off the dribble jumpers. Apparently that’s a crime in today’s NBA.

As Popovich just said:
“These days there’s such an emphasis on the three because it’s proven to be analytically correct,” Popovich Monday offered with what appeared to be a sneer. “Now you look at a stat sheet after a game and the first thing you look at is the threes. If you made threes and the other team didn’t, you win. You don’t even look at the rebounds or the turnovers or how much transition D was involved. You don’t even care. That’s how much an impact the three-point shot has and it’s evidenced by how everybody plays.”

“I hate it, but I always have,” Popovich said even as he’s adjusted over the years. “I’ve hated the three for 20 years. That’s why I make a joke all the time (and say) if we’re going to make it a different game, let’s have a four-point play. Because if everybody likes the three, they’ll really like the four. People will jump out of their seats if you have a five-point play. It will be great. There’s no basketball anymore, there’s no beauty in it. It’s pretty boring. But it is what it is and you need to work with it.”
Wow. I’ve thought this for a long time. I’m glad Pop expressed it. CBB can be an ugly game at times, especially with coaches teaching their players to basically foul on every play, assuming that the refs can’t call everything. But the NBA has become pretty boring and same old, same old every possession. It’s really lost it’s beauty and variety and ability to surprise. Man, I miss the days of Magic-Bird and Celtics-Lakers and then Jordan and the Bulls.
 


Top Bottom