Overtime with Carc and Mike Powell

bjred

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That was a good listen, didn't realize he was involved in so many different things. Little sad to hear him say he kinda lost the lacrosse passion. I think he's right though, and some posters have offered the same sentiment in that the program has kinda lost its free flowing movement. He commented on one of the last SU games he went to was against Albany when Lyle was playing and SU just seemed robotic in their movements. There didn't seem to be that creative flow to the team like when he used to watch as a kid growing up. It shouldn't have had to come to it but maybe the shot clock can bring that style back into the game.
 

jr4750

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That was a good listen, didn't realize he was involved in so many different things. Little sad to hear him say he kinda lost the lacrosse passion. I think he's right though, and some posters have offered the same sentiment in that the program has kinda lost its free flowing movement. He commented on one of the last SU games he went to was against Albany when Lyle was playing and SU just seemed robotic in their movements. There didn't seem to be that creative flow to the team like when he used to watch as a kid growing up. It shouldn't have had to come to it but maybe the shot clock can bring that style back into the game.
Was just going to come on here and make sure this was posted. Should have realized it wouldn't escape OX's grasp!

Really interesting take by MP on the state of the program. If you haven't listened, you should. BJ gives a good synopsis, but I would advise listening to Mikes tone as he speaks. Says a lot.
 

ohmilax34

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If Syracuse played a real free flowing style (with lots of fast breaks, lots of pressing out on defense, they would probably lose more games than they do now. They still push transition, see the Kennedy goal vs. JHU, and plenty of other long pole or SSDM goals this season. On offense there is a lot of movement and it's a fun offense to watch when it's clicking. SU still tries to make plays in the "gray" area as John Danowski would call it. Fernandez pushes out on the ball. Solomon is creative. Porter gets the ball out of his stick quickly when he makes a save.

SU won the national championship in 2004 with Mike Powell and they scored very few fast break goals in the semifinal vs. JHU or the final vs. Navy. Literally they may have scored one unsettled goal vs. JHU, and that was Powell's only goal of the game, yet SU won 15-9, because they played great 6v6 offense with a lot of movement by all the players on offense and the ball moved fast. In the final vs. Navy they played pretty much the same way. Again, Powell scored a fast break goal at the end, but mostly SU scored in 6v6 with great team offense. The SU defense played zone in for most of these games, because they couldn't press out and take the ball away.
 

ohmilax34

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OH, AND Mike Powell hasn't played a meaningful lacrosse game in how long??? Over 10 years? Sometimes when we remember how things were our memories aren't an accurate reflection of how things really were.
 

DoctahLexus

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If Syracuse played a real free flowing style (with lots of fast breaks, lots of pressing out on defense, they would probably lose more games than they do now. They still push transition, see the Kennedy goal vs. JHU, and plenty of other long pole or SSDM goals this season. On offense there is a lot of movement and it's a fun offense to watch when it's clicking. SU still tries to make plays in the "gray" area as John Danowski would call it. Fernandez pushes out on the ball. Solomon is creative. Porter gets the ball out of his stick quickly when he makes a save.

SU won the national championship in 2004 with Mike Powell and they scored very few fast break goals in the semifinal vs. JHU or the final vs. Navy. Literally they may have scored one unsettled goal vs. JHU, and that was Powell's only goal of the game, yet SU won 15-9, because they played great 6v6 offense with a lot of movement by all the players on offense and the ball moved fast. In the final vs. Navy they played pretty much the same way. Again, Powell scored a fast break goal at the end, but mostly SU scored in 6v6 with great team offense. The SU defense played zone in for most of these games, because they couldn't press out and take the ball away.
As much as I love that man to death/he is the reason I play the game/he was my childhood hero/he is arguably the best lacrosse player of all time...you ain't saying anything that's not true.
 

ohmilax34

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As much as I love that man to death/he is the reason I play the game/he was my childhood hero/he is arguably the best lacrosse player of all time...you ain't saying anything that's not true.
Thank you!
 

SULAXAHOLIC

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If Syracuse played a real free flowing style (with lots of fast breaks, lots of pressing out on defense, they would probably lose more games than they do now. They still push transition, see the Kennedy goal vs. JHU, and plenty of other long pole or SSDM goals this season. On offense there is a lot of movement and it's a fun offense to watch when it's clicking. SU still tries to make plays in the "gray" area as John Danowski would call it. Fernandez pushes out on the ball. Solomon is creative. Porter gets the ball out of his stick quickly when he makes a save.

SU won the national championship in 2004 with Mike Powell and they scored very few fast break goals in the semifinal vs. JHU or the final vs. Navy. Literally they may have scored one unsettled goal vs. JHU, and that was Powell's only goal of the game, yet SU won 15-9, because they played great 6v6 offense with a lot of movement by all the players on offense and the ball moved fast. In the final vs. Navy they played pretty much the same way. Again, Powell scored a fast break goal at the end, but mostly SU scored in 6v6 with great team offense. The SU defense played zone in for most of these games, because they couldn't press out and take the ball away.
The last goal Mike Powell scored was a fast break on a breakaway with under a minuet to go it put Syracuse up by 2 and Desko was beyond livid with him because all they had to do was kill the clock. Instead Navy got the ball back scored and almost tied it if it werent for a diving trail check from Park they very well may have tied it. I totally agree with Mike that the game has lost alot of its free flow and creativity but I would credit that to Bill Tierney and the Princeton Tigers of the 90's and early 2000's with his redlight offense. The offense was designed to capitalize on Syracuse's aggressive style by holding the ball until the defense grew frustrated made a mistake or took a penalty in turn it kept the ball out of Syracuse's stick frustrating the players on offense so that when they did get the ball they rushed trying to make things happen resulting in a high rate of turn overs. It was an incredibly painful style of lacrosse to watch as a Syracuse fan in my opinion it was horrible for the game but it was fantastic for Tierney and Princeton to the tune of 6 titles in 10 years. When Desko took over he came up with the hybrid of pushing transition when it was there but also being able to play 6 on 6 in my opinion he is the most versatile coach of all time his in game adjustments are second to none. With that said I dont think he is anywhere near the players coach Simmons was he is just not that way. All in all the game has changed do I wish it was more like the 80's and 90's with out a doubt I do but I agree 100 percent that SU would lose more games and in my opinion have several less titles
 

ForCuseSake

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The last goal Mike Powell scored was a fast break on a breakaway with under a minuet to go it put Syracuse up by 2 and Desko was beyond livid with him because all they had to do was kill the clock. Instead Navy got the ball back scored and almost tied it if it werent for a diving trail check from Park they very well may have tied it. I totally agree with Mike that the game has lost alot of its free flow and creativity but I would credit that to Bill Tierney and the Princeton Tigers of the 90's and early 2000's with his redlight offense. The offense was designed to capitalize on Syracuse's aggressive style by holding the ball until the defense grew frustrated made a mistake or took a penalty in turn it kept the ball out of Syracuse's stick frustrating the players on offense so that when they did get the ball they rushed trying to make things happen resulting in a high rate of turn overs. It was an incredibly painful style of lacrosse to watch as a Syracuse fan in my opinion it was horrible for the game but it was fantastic for Tierney and Princeton to the tune of 6 titles in 10 years. When Desko took over he came up with the hybrid of pushing transition when it was there but also being able to play 6 on 6 in my opinion he is the most versatile coach of all time his in game adjustments are second to none. With that said I dont think he is anywhere near the players coach Simmons was he is just not that way. All in all the game has changed do I wish it was more like the 80's and 90's with out a doubt I do but I agree 100 percent that SU would lose more games and in my opinion have several less titles
Agree 100% regarding Tierney's stall ball tactics at Princeton.

The other thing he did that helped wreck the game's speed is hyper-specialization. He recruited huge defensive players and made sure they swapped defensive middie lines out all the time.

This contributed to the paint-drying pace he played.

The game won't ever be as free flowing with current stick technology - the ball doesn't hit the turf enough. While more kids pick up the game at an earlier age i don't think their stick skills would be as good if they played with a 90s era Excalibur let alone a Superlite II.
 

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