Wendell Carter's mom is cuckoo for cocoa puffs

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HOFCeluck

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#3
When you remove all the bling and the bells and the sneakers and all that, you've paid for a child to come to your school to do what you wanted them to do for you, for free, and you made a lot of money when he did that, and you've got all these rules in place that say he cannot share in any of that," Carter said, according to ESPN's Heather Dinich.

"The only other time when labor does not get paid but yet someone else gets profits and the labor is black and the profit is white, is in slavery. To be honest with you, it's nauseating."
Eh. I mean...
 

rrlbees

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#5
Ex-Duke star's mom: NCAA rules like slavery


Say what you want about the NCAA, but comparing college basketball to slavery is just wrong; and severely minimizes and trivializes it's (slavery's) impact on millions of people.
She talks like her son was used. Maybe. But some of these kids, like hers, use the schools to in order to get to the nba as fast as possible. I’m also confused by her complaints about academic advisors. These kids get that in spades.
 

Capt. Tuttle

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#8
Ex-Duke star's mom: NCAA rules like slavery


Say what you want about the NCAA, but comparing college basketball to slavery is just wrong; and severely minimizes and trivializes it's (slavery's) impact on millions of people.
Here is a solution to idiots like this,who only see things in terms of slavery and race. Pay the players, then withhold the cost of attending Duke (or school X) and attending classes, as that is a requirement of you getting paid. Also, be sure to withhold federal, state and local taxes, as well as workers' comp and disability. Whatever is left is their compensation.
Then, build in a fine system for not doing well in class, as that impacts APR, which impacts the ability to give scholarships. Build in a fine system for missed classes and assignments, as well as actions which reflect badly upon your employer.
 

newmexicuse

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#9
many here have said similar things wo playing the slavery card.

we all know the present system leaves a lot to be desired.

i think if she had modernized her comments it might have had less dramatic effect, but they would have been taken more seriously.
 

jncuse

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#10
Well...Wendell did receive an opportunity for a Duke education which is currently valued at $72,710 per year. So he was compensated 176% higher than the average annual salary in North Carolina. Some people just need to shut up.
His education did not cost the University $72,710, nor are students subsidizing that cost as you had said recently. If they had paid cash of $72,710 that is compensation.

The real cost to the university of adding 13 additional people to the university is a mere fraction of $72K per student. The variable costs of adding a student to the campus are not that large.

That being said while I am anti NCAA when it comes to certain matters it is not slavery either and it is absurd to compare it to slavery. Doesn't mean it is fair, but not slavery.

If you want compare it to something that frightens some Americans, it is communism. All student athletes receive the same thing no matter what they generate for a university,
 

reedny

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#11
His education did not cost the University $72,710, nor are students subsidizing that cost as you had said recently. If they had paid cash of $72,710 that is compensation.

The real cost to the university of adding 13 additional people to the university is a mere fraction of $72K per student.
I don't think that's correct. SU is NFP. The costs and revenue each year add up to zero ... with the tuition at current levels. You may not place that value on an SU education .. that's a different issue. But the numbers are what they are.
 

Alsacs

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#12
The NCAA makes billions off these kids on the tournament and gives them nothing.
The schools atleast give them scholarships and provides for them.
What does the NCAA do for the players?
Except have figure head jobs that pay people hundreds of thousand of dollars or millions that are pointless.
 
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#13
For some college players, the educational value is enough (college role player). For others, that same value is well under what they deserve (NBA bound star). Is it really that hard to reconcile that? Not all players provide the same value to their school/conference.
 

newmexicuse

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#14
The NCAA makes billions off these kids on the tournament and gives them nothing.
The schools atleast give them scholarships and provides for them.
What does the NCAA do for the players?
Except have figure head jobs that pay people hundreds of thousand of dollars or millions that are pointless.
so what does the ncaa do w all of those profits other than hiring syracuse investigators and nc rationalizers ???
 

realorange

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#16
For some college players, the educational value is enough (college role player). For others, that same value is well under what they deserve (NBA bound star). Is it really that hard to reconcile that? Not all players provide the same value to their school/conference.
And who makes the judgement of the "deserving" student?
 
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#17
The original mission of college athletics (let's say late 1800's) was to provide some esprit de corps for the student body, to be a healthy channel for physically gifted students, and to pursue excellence in a field of human endeavor.
Then money came into the picture.
What is the modern day mission of college athletics? Can it be stated without caving in to the millions of dollars in revenue?
 

NKR1978

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#20
The original mission of college athletics (let's say late 1800's) was to provide some esprit de corps for the student body, to be a healthy channel for physically gifted students, and to pursue excellence in a field of human endeavor.
Then money came into the picture.
What is the modern day mission of college athletics? Can it be stated without caving in to the millions of dollars in revenue?
The money in college football started immediately. Yale/Harvard/Princeton stacked their teams with non-students and payed them to play for them. The first regulations about eligibility were that teams had to be made up of people who were at least tangentially connected to the schools. There has almost literally never been a time where college football wasn't about money.
 

NKR1978

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#21
For some college players, the educational value is enough (college role player). For others, that same value is well under what they deserve (NBA bound star). Is it really that hard to reconcile that? Not all players provide the same value to their school/conference.
Then let the ones who do make money off their celebrity.
 

NKR1978

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#22
The NCAA makes billions off these kids on the tournament and gives them nothing.
The schools atleast give them scholarships and provides for them.
What does the NCAA do for the players?
Except have figure head jobs that pay people hundreds of thousand of dollars or millions that are pointless.
Mark Emmert, the president of a "non-profit," flies by private jet.

Using the NCAA's "logic," every NCAA employee should make the exact same salary because everyone is of equal value to the organization.
 

orangefog

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#24
I don’t know why people are going down the money hole. Unless she’s lying she said it wasn’t about paying players. She went on and on about education support and what sounded like educating players about the one and done process.
Crap, I guess I should have read the article. But that takes too much time, and I prefer writing my own story in my head based on the headline.
 


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