Sorry, but it is time...

rrlbees

2017 ESPN Tourney Challenge Winner
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If he's not healthy, then he shouldn't be playing.
I watch other sports; I imagine that you do, too.
There are somewhat "standard" recovery times for certain types of injuries, so I don't find it "callous" to say that if the guy is healthy enough to play, then he's got to play better. And if he's still hurt, then why is he playing so much? That's on the coach and the medical staff.
Some injuries you can’t get to 100% without using it. We need Frank to be as close to 100% as possible if this team is going to turn things around. He’s not going to get there by not playing. If in fact he did have ankle surgery, he most likely had a plate and screws put in. That can mean 3 months of no running and as much as a year to be 100% recovered including getting past the mental aspect of it feeling normal without fear.

Here’s a good article about ankle surgery, if like I said he did have ankle surgery. More towards the end it talks about it being a year.

“In general, you can attempt to start running about three to four months after your injury. By this time, the bones in your ankle should be well healed and your ROM and strength should be close to normal. You can progress your running mileage as long as your pain is minimal and your ROM and strength remain excellent. By six to nine months after your injury, you should be able to run without problems.”

“Again, everyone is different and every injury is different. Some people are able to run much sooner after breaking their ankle. Unfortunately, some people continue to be limited by pain, loss of ROM or limited strength long after their injury and may take longer to return to running. And there are some people who can never get back to running, even after putting in their best effort to regain normal mobility and strength around their ankle.”

When to Start Running After an Ankle Fracture?

E8B31748-A6B7-41C3-B98A-7610B7A58500.jpeg
 

RF2044

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Some injuries you can’t get to 100% without using it. We need Frank to be as close to 100% as possible if this team is going to turn things around. He’s not going to get there by not playing. If in fact he did have ankle surgery, he most likely had a plate and screws put in. That can mean 3 months of no running and as much as a year to be 100% recovered including getting past the mental aspect of it feeling normal without fear.

Here’s a good article about ankle surgery, if like I said he did have ankle surgery. More towards the end it talks about it being a year.

“In general, you can attempt to start running about three to four months after your injury. By this time, the bones in your ankle should be well healed and your ROM and strength should be close to normal. You can progress your running mileage as long as your pain is minimal and your ROM and strength remain excellent. By six to nine months after your injury, you should be able to run without problems.”

“Again, everyone is different and every injury is different. Some people are able to run much sooner after breaking their ankle. Unfortunately, some people continue to be limited by pain, loss of ROM or limited strength long after their injury and may take longer to return to running. And there are some people who can never get back to running, even after putting in their best effort to regain normal mobility and strength around their ankle.”

When to Start Running After an Ankle Fracture?

View attachment 148948
The range of motion limitation is likely what is impacting his lateral mobility. And the lack of strength [currently] is evident in why he doesn't seem to be getting enough legs under jump shot.

Again, if a broken ankle is indeed what he is recuperating from.
 
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CousCuse

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Oh good Jeff Jones is on our short list now! Yes!!! Fantastic! Endorsed by CousCuse too!
Indiana and UCLA are both top blue bloods and have a lot of people who get paid a lot of money to think about and make basketball decisions and yet they are both still both stuck in neutral. So, who's to say what person will take the reigns and keep the program at a high level.
 

SoBeCuse

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If he's not healthy, then he shouldn't be playing.
I watch other sports; I imagine that you do, too.
There are somewhat "standard" recovery times for certain types of injuries, so I don't find it "callous" to say that if the guy is healthy enough to play, then he's got to play better. And if he's still hurt, then why is he playing so much? That's on the coach and the medical staff.
I agree but this team needs to win. Carey is behind in terms of being able to run the point I suspect from an aptitude standpoint. I guess the offense is that complex. Battle can’t play there and is a hot mess. Donovan Mitchell slid right in to play PG beautifully when Quentin Snider got injured. No problem. We don’t have that kind of combo. HW is done so we’re screwed. Carey struggling and/or not getting more minutes is REALLY disappointing.
 
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CuseFaninVT

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Some injuries you can’t get to 100% without using it. We need Frank to be as close to 100% as possible if this team is going to turn things around. He’s not going to get there by not playing. If in fact he did have ankle surgery, he most likely had a plate and screws put in. That can mean 3 months of no running and as much as a year to be 100% recovered including getting past the mental aspect of it feeling normal without fear.

Here’s a good article about ankle surgery, if like I said he did have ankle surgery. More towards the end it talks about it being a year.

“In general, you can attempt to start running about three to four months after your injury. By this time, the bones in your ankle should be well healed and your ROM and strength should be close to normal. You can progress your running mileage as long as your pain is minimal and your ROM and strength remain excellent. By six to nine months after your injury, you should be able to run without problems.”

“Again, everyone is different and every injury is different. Some people are able to run much sooner after breaking their ankle. Unfortunately, some people continue to be limited by pain, loss of ROM or limited strength long after their injury and may take longer to return to running. And there are some people who can never get back to running, even after putting in their best effort to regain normal mobility and strength around their ankle.”

When to Start Running After an Ankle Fracture?

View attachment 148948

Is no one else completely freaked out about the fact the doctor missed the plate with the screw third up from the bottom?

And yes, I know that's not an x-ray of Frank's ankle.
 
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I'll preface this by saying I have a sports medicine background and have taken care of a lot of ankles. I can say with almost complete certainty that that x-ray does not represent Frank's ankle. The x-ray represents a patient who underwent surgery to stabilize 2 if not 3 fractures. In fact, the fractures of the fibula (plates and screws, right side of the image) and tibia,(large screw left side of image) would require months of rehabilitation and would have caused him to miss much more time than he did More likely, Frank had a minor procedure, which still causes issues with pain, range of motion, balance and a sense of the ankle giving way which is likely part of the reason he has not regained his old form yet.
 


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